gluten-free

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

Posted by on Aug 22, 2018 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, gluten-free, healthier, no-bake dessert | 0 comments

I present to you my recipe for Nutty Bites. These are a fantastic snack or breakfast.

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

Plus, they are super-healthy, loaded with nuts and seeds, totally gluten-free, with honey as the sweetener and binding agent.

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

This is an easy recipe to customize, too. Keep the amounts of nuts and seeds the same, but switch in peanuts, hazelnuts, walnuts, wheat germ, sunflower kernels… whatever you like!

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

You can toast the nuts first, if you choose. I actually preferred it untoasted. Do note that some smaller add-ins like pepitas can burn quickly, and burned pepitas don’t taste that great. (Voice of experience here.)

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

I can report that these keep well in the freezer for at least a month, too. Just make sure to have something like waxed paper between the layers–and even then, in a few spots with heavy honey, the bars might stick.

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

Oh, and did I mention that this is entirely made on stovetop? No need to heat up the house by turning on the oven! Whip out your candy thermometer and you’ll have Nutty Bites ready in no time flat.

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

 

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

Bready or Not Original: Nutty Bites

Toast the nuts first if you choose (though watch out, pepitas can burn fast), but untoasted, unsalted nuts offer a nice clean flavor here. Feel free to substitute other nuts or other add-ins (like wheat germ for chia seeds or flaxseed). A candy thermometer is necessary for this recipe.

  • 1/2 cup macadamia nuts
  • 1/2 cup pecans
  • 1/2 cup almonds
  • 1/2 cup pepitas
  • 1/4 cup chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup ground flaxseed
  • 3/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup water
  • sprinkle salt

Mix the nuts and seeds together in a large glass or metal bowl. Prepare an 8x8 pan with parchment paper or aluminum foil, and grease well.

Heat the honey and water in a medium saucepan on medium-high. Use a candy thermometer to track the temperature as it rises to 275-degrees (soft crack stage). Stay close to the pan at all times! Once the honey starts boiling, it will bubble excessively, so keep stirring and use great caution.

As soon as it reaches 275-degrees, pour the honey mix over the nuts and seeds. Stir to coat. It will harden quickly, so move fast! Pour everything into the ready pan and press out evenly.

Let set out for an hour. Use a knife or bench knife to chop into squares. Store at room temperature in a sealed container between wax paper layers; they can also be frozen.

OM NOM NOM!

Read More

Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

Posted by on Aug 1, 2018 in beef, Blog, Bready or Not, gluten-free, healthier, main dish | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

Beef jerky is expensive to buy. If you can catch a good sale on an eye of round roast, this recipe makes cheap and delicious Homemade Beef Jerky.

Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

It’s really amazing how easy this recipe is. Cut up roast into chunks. Cover pieces in spices. Marinate for a day in the fridge. Bake for 6 to 7 hours. Done.

I’ve made this recipe a couple times now, and honestly, the weirdest thing is keeping the meat at room temperature after baking.

Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

I mean, I’m used to doing that with store-bought jerky, but it feels weird to do that with home-cooked meat. However, I haven’t sickened or killed myself or various loved one with my homemade jerky, so I take that as a positive.

Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

Most of the eye of round roasts I find on sale tend to be over 2 1/2 pounds. I just use more generous measures of spices for the rub. This isn’t a recipe where everything needs to be exact. Just make sure there’s enough rub to cover everything.

Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

Also, the amount of cayenne looks like a lot, but the heat in this recipe is pleasant, not set-your-mouth-on-fire level. I can testify that myself and others who can’t stand spicy-hot have eaten this jerky without any issues.

And if you want more heat, by all means. Dump in more cayenne!

Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

Modified from Michael Symon’s Beef Jerky recipe in Food Network Magazine, December 2017.

Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

Bready or Not: Homemade Beef Jerky

If using a larger roast, such as one closer to 3 pounds, just use heaping amounts of spices to create the rub. Note that the recipe requires a day of marinating prior to baking. After cooking, the dried meat is stored at room temperature.

  • 2 to 2 1/2 pounds beef eye of round roast, trimmed of all fat
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons white sugar
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika

Slice the beef against the grain into chunks roughly 1 inch by 3 inches long. If the pieces look large, that's fine; they'll shrink a lot as they cook.

In a mixing bowl, combine all of the spices. Liberally cover the beef pieces, using the entire mix. Place beef in a gallon bag, and keep sealed in the fridge for 24 hours or so.

Preheat oven at 250-degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil and place a metal rack on top; apply nonstick spray. Set the meat on the rack so that no pieces are touching.

Bake for 6 to 7 hours, until quite dry. If you want pieces chewier, remove closer to 6 hour point.

Let cool completely to finish drying. Store in sealed container at room temperature for up to several months.

OM NOM NOM!

Read More

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies [Redux]

Posted by on May 9, 2018 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, cookies, gluten-free, healthier | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies [Redux]

Cookies for breakfast. Healthy cookies. No refined sugars. Vegan. Also gluten-free, if you use GF oats.

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies

Even better: they taste delicious.

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies

This is one of my favorite breakfast recipes, one I’ve made at least once a month for the past five years. In fact, I posted it on Bready or Not back in 2014. Delicious as the cookies are, I couldn’t finagle the lighting then to do the recipe justice. Now, thanks to my Shotbox, I can.

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies

I customize these cookies based on my mood and what I have on hand. I’ve used macadamia nut butter, cashew butter, and almond butter–and combinations thereof. I’ve used apple butter, pumpkin butter, and date butter–and in a pinch, I’ve used applesauce and doubled the cinnamon.

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies

For the dried fruit, I often use a mix of golden raisins and dried cranberries, but I’ve thrown in dried blueberries, too. If you don’t have pepitas, use sunflower kernels or other chopped nuts.

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies

I usually whip up a batch and freeze 2/3 of it right away. The cookies keep perfectly fine in a room temperature sealed container for over a week. Two or three cookies make for a great breakfast prior to exercising!

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies

Did I mention they are also delicious?

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies [Redux]

Bready or Not: Healthy Breakfast Cookies

These delicious breakfast cookies can be customized in a myriad of ways. Use any kind or combination of nut butters, dried fruit, or seeds and nuts. All kinds of fruit butters work here, or use a single-serving cup of applesauce and double the cinnamon. The cookies keep perfectly fine in a room temperature sealed container for over a week, and can also be frozen for over a month. Makes about 28 tablespoon-sized cookies.

  • 2 cups quick oats (not whole or old-fashioned oats)
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup nut butter
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup or honey
  • 3/4 cup fruit butter (apple butter, date butter, etc)
  • 1 cup dried fruit (raisins, cranberries, etc)
  • 1/2 cup pepitas (shelled pumpkin seeds) or other seeds or nuts
  • 1/4 cup ground flaxseed or wheat germ

Preheat oven to 325-degrees. Prepare cookie sheets with parchment or silicone baking mats, or use seasoned stoneware.

Combine all of the ingredients into a large bowl.

Using a tablespoon or tablespoon scoop, drop dollops of dough onto cookie sheet. Note that it won't spread. Use fingers to gently tamp down top and press in stray oats on the sides; it will be a little sticky.

Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until the cookies are just set. Cool for several minutes before transitioning them to a rack to finish cooling.

OM NOM NOM!

Read More

Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

Posted by on Mar 21, 2018 in Blog, Bready or Not, brownies, chocolate, gluten-free, healthier | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

I often get requests for more gluten-free sweets. Here you go. These brownies are so good, people won’t even know they lack gluten.

Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

They also happen to be grain-free. Just don’t give them to people who have almond allergies!

Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

These brownies are fast to assemble. The end result tastes like standard brownies. I didn’t find them super moist, but they were nice and chewy.

Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

They kept pretty well in a sealed container for several days, too. The cut edges dried out a bit, but they were still delicious.

Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

Here’s a tip for you: almond flour, because of its high fat content, can spoil. Keep it in the freezer! It won’t freeze solid but it will get clumpy. Hence my note in the ingredients list to sift the almond flour.

Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

Modified from King Arthur Flour.

 

Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

Bready or Not: Gluten-Free Almond Flour Brownies

These delicious brownies are gluten-free and grain-free, and they come together almost as fast as a box mix! Modified from King Arthur Flour.

  • 5 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 3/4 cups sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup cocoa powder, sifted
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups almond flour, sifted
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

Preheat oven at 350-degrees. Line an 8x8 or 9x9 pan with foil and apply butter or nonstick spray.

In the microwave, melt the butter in a medium-sized bowl. Stir in the sugar, salt, vanilla, cocoa, and eggs. Add in the almond flour and baking powder. Pour batter into the ready pan.

Bake for 33 to 38 minutes, until the top is set and the middle just passes the toothpick test. Let cool, then cut into blocks. Store at room temperature in a sealed container or freeze for later enjoyment.

OM NOM NOM!

Read More

Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

Posted by on Jan 17, 2018 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, gluten-free, healthier | Comments Off on Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

The breakfast theme goes healthy this week with my original recipe for Vanilla Pecan Granola!

Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

If you eat gluten-free, this should be of particular interest. Use GF oats and other contaminant-free ingredients, and this will be a delicious, fiber-full option for you.

Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

This is ridiculously easy to make, too. Combine, bake, stir every so often, then let it air out. Ta-da!

Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

The granola keeps well for weeks, and the flavor is just so fresh. The recipe includes a full tablespoon of vanilla, which is a lot, yeah, but I do love that strong flavor. Some of the store granolas are wimpy in that regard.

Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

Use this as a topping for yogurt or ice cream, or in milk like a cereal, or as a snack to munch out of your palm. However you eat it, it’ll be delicious!

Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

Bready or Not Original: (Gluten Free) Vanilla Pecan Granola

This homemade granola is super-easy to make and tastes strongly of vanilla and cinnamon. These flavors will provide a much-needed pick-me-up atop yogurt, ice cream, or eaten straight out of hand! Use gluten-free oats and other contaminant-free ingredients to make this for the gluten-intolerant.

  • 2 1/2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats [gluten-free or regular]
  • 3/4 cup chopped pecans
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • pinch salt
  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract

Preheat oven at 300-degrees. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper.

In a large bowl, toss together the oats, pecans, cinnamon, and salt. In another bowl, whisk together the maple syrup, coconut oil, and vanilla extract. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry, and stir well to coat completely.

Spread the granola onto the prepared sheet. Bake for 45 minutes, with a pause to stir every 15 minutes. Then let the granola sit out to cool and dry for several hours.

Granola will keep for weeks in a sealed container. Can also be frozen for several months.

OM NOM NOM!

Save

Read More

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

Posted by on Jan 3, 2018 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, gluten-free, pork | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

We’re kicking off a breakfast theme for a month with a recipe that will step-by-step teach you how to cure your own bacon.

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

I guarantee this will be among the best, if not THE best, bacon you will have in your life. Fresh really makes the difference.

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

This recipe is not difficult. In all honesty, the greatest challenge is that the curing bacon takes up a lot of fridge space for about 10 days.

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

I completely modified this from a Michael Symon recipe featured in Food Network Magazine, March 2014. The only way that I can buy pork belly locally is from Costco (for about $2.69 a lb!), so this is a Costco-sized recipe.

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

If you can buy a smaller pork belly slab, then just halve the ingredients. Otherwise, buy the big belly and follow all of the steps I provide… which means you’ll have another slab of frozen bacon already seasoned and prepped to cure in a few weeks or months.

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

After the meat is smoked, slice it up and use it however you want. I find that home-cured bacon cooks much faster than the store stuff, though it can be much thicker, and the bits that look burned aren’t usually burned.

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

The smoked meat also freezes and keeps for weeks or months. Just thaw it in the fridge when you’re ready, and use it however you wish.

You’ll wish to eat every last morsel. Trust me.

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

This recipe does require some supplies that you likely don’t have in the cupboard, and might be hard to find locally. Amazon, of course, has everything. I recommend them for buying 2-gallon zipper bags as well as pink curing salt (plus, you get enough salt to last through the apocalypse). Note that pink curing salt is essential here because it has salt and sodium nitrate, which keeps the meat pink and kills bacteria. Normal salts don’t pack that wallop.

 

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

Bready or Not: Cato Home-Cured Bacon

This recipe uses a 9-10 lb pork belly slab like those found at Costco, and cutting that in half to cure part now and the other part later. If you have a smaller pork belly, halve these ingredient amounts and go from there.

Note that you need 2-gallon re-sealable plastic bags to hold the meat, and pink curing salt; neither is likely found in local grocery stores, but they are on Amazon. You cannot substitute other salts for the pink curing salt! The pink type is necessary for the curing process.

Full preparation time on this includes about 9-10 days in the fridge: about 7 days to cure, and 2 days for it to dry, followed by the day of smoking.

  • 9 to 10 lb pork belly
  • 1/2 cup kosher salt
  • 4 teaspoons pink curing salt
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 cup paprika (sweet or smoky)

Cut the pork belly slab in half and rinse and pat dry both pieces. Place them in separate re-sealable 2-gallon plastic bags.

Mix together the spice rub. It'll form a thick paste. Roughly divide it into quarters, and use a quarter on each side of a pork piece. The rub will be very lumpy. Don't worry about a perfect, even coating; the pork will release juices and the flavors will seep in during the curing process.

Close both bags, pressing out as much air as possible. Freeze one bag for later; as a precaution against holes getting torn in the bag, wrap it well in plastic wrap, too. When ready to start the curing process for this half, add another day or two to the curing time in the fridge to account for thawing time.

As for the ready piece of pork belly, set that bag in the fridge for the next 7 to 10 days, until it feels firm. Flip the meat once a day.

Remove the pork belly from the bag. Rinse it well and pat it dry. Set it on a rack on a small cookie sheet in the fridge and let it dry for another two days. No need to flip it at this point.

Set up your smoker at 200-degrees. Applewood chips are a great choice, but maple and hickory are fantastic as well. Smoke the pork belly for about 3 hours, until the bacon reaches an internal temperature of about 150-degrees.

From this point, slice and cook the meat as you would regular bacon, but note that this fresher, homemade variety will cook much faster. Use plastic wrap or plastic bags to store the sliced meat in the fridge for upwards of a week, or freeze for up to 2 months.

OM NOM NOM!

Read More