yeast bread

Bready or Not: Yeasted Waffles

Posted by on Feb 22, 2017 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, main dish, yeast bread | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Yeasted Waffles

If you’re in need of a quick-fix breakfast, whip up a batch of these yeasted waffles! Chill the batter for at least 4 hours and you can start using it; the batter can stay in the fridge up to 3 days.

Bready or Not: Yeasted Waffles

I was really impressed with how this batter kept, too. I noticed no difference in the taste for day to day, and I kept it chilled for the 3 day max stated in the original Eating Well recipe.

Bready or Not: Yeasted Waffles

That said, these do taste different than normal waffles. There’s yeast in there! I found them to have a slightly sourdough flavor, which was not off-putting in the slightest.

Like any homemade waffles, the cooked waffles also keep very well frozen between layers of waxed paper. You stick the frozen waffles straight into the toaster like you would the store-bought version.

Bready or Not: Yeasted Waffles

No matter how quickly these waffles are cooked up, they make for a convenient and delicious breakfast!

Modified from the original from the March/April 2016 Eating Well Magazine.

Bready or Not: Yeasted Waffles

Bready or Not: Yeasted Waffles

This waffle batter needs at least 4 hours to chill and can stay in the fridge for up to 3 days. This makes for a super-fast breakfast (or breakfast-for-supper) for days in a row! The yeast lends these waffles a taste similar to sourdough. Recipe makes about 10 waffles using scant half cups of batter.

  • 2 3/4 cups almond milk or other milk
  • 6 Tablespoons butter cut into pieces
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour or whole wheat flour, or mix
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons sugar
  • 1 packet active yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons)
  • 3/4 teaspoons salt
  • 3 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

In a small saucepan, heat milk and butter over medium until the butter is melted. Set aside to let cool until it's just warm, about 15 minutes.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, yeast, and salt. Add in the milk mixture followed by the eggs and vanilla extract. Stir together until just combined.

Refrigerate the batter for at least 4 hours, or up to 3 days.

Preheat waffle iron. Gently stir the batter to reconstitute. Use about scant 1/2 cup of batter for each waffle; the waffles will expand as they cook, and the iron might overflow on the first attempts you get a feel for the right amount to pour in.

Return any unused batter to the fridge for later enjoyment. Cooked waffles can also be frozen.

OM NOM NOM!

Bready or Not: Yeasted Waffles

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Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

Posted by on Feb 8, 2017 in Blog, Bready or Not, side dish, yeast bread | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

This recipe for Hokkaido-style milk bread rolls makes 8 delicious soft, airy, amazing rolls.

Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

I couldn’t help but be intrigued when I saw this recipe featured in a King Arthur Flour catalog. It relates to the cultural fusion that plays a major role in my latest book, Breath of Earth.

Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

See, yeast breads in Japan were a real life kind of steampunk innovation. European bakeries began to open in major Japanese cities in the 1800s, but they didn’t become more popular until later in the century when bakers began to fuse more Japanese flavors like adzuki paste into rolls. These kinds of sweet bread (kashi-pan) play a small yet vital role in my next book, Call of Fire.

Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

This particular roll isn’t sweet unless you add some jam on your own. These are more of a combination between a standard dinner roll and an egg-based bread like challah.

I usually don’t make breads that involve a pre-ferment stage, but I was pleased with how easy this was to make. I had the dough mix and rise in my bread machine, but you can mix this by whatever method you choose.

Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

This is modified from the recipe at King Arthur Flour. They note there that this can also be made in loaf form. I also have my own recipe for doing a full loaf of Japanese-style Milk Bread (Shokupan). This is my usual load bread that I make about twice a week.

I can tell you, my husband wouldn’t mind if I made these rolls a lot more frequently as well.

Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

This recipe, modified from King Arthur Flour, produces 8 airy and delicious Hokkaido-style milk bread rolls. It uses a fermented starter called a tangzhong that is mixed into the bread dough.

  • Tangzhong (starter)
  • 3 Tablespoons water
  • 3 Tablespoons whole milk or half & half
  • 2 Tablespoons bread flour
  • Dough
  • 2 1/2 cups bread flour
  • 2 Tablespoons nonfat dry milk
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 Tablespoon instant yeast
  • 1/2 cup whole milk or half & half
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) melted unsalted butter
  • optional: an egg or extra milk for a wash

To make the tangzhong:

Combine the starter ingredients in a small saucepan on low heat. Whisk until no lumps remain and continue to beat until it's thick and the whisk leaves no lines across the bottom of the pan; this takes 3 to 5 minutes. Pour it into a cup and set it aside to cool to room temperature.

To make the dough:

Combine the remaining dough ingredients and add the tangzhong. Continue to knead by hand, mixer, or bread machine until a smooth, elastic dough forms. Add more milk or flour if necessary to achieve the right texture.

Shape the dough into a ball and set it in a lightly greased covered bowl for about 60 to 90 minutes. It should be puffy, not necessarily doubled in size.

Prepare a small cake pan by lining the bottom with a cut round of parchment paper. Use nonstick spray on the base of the pan so the parchment stays in place, then spray the top of the paper and the sides of the pan.

Gently deflate the dough and divide it into 8 equal pieces. Shape each piece into a ball and place them in the pan. Cover it with plastic wrap and let the rolls rest for 30 minutes to an hour; keep an eye on them in case they rise fast!

Preheat the oven at 350-degrees. Gently brush the rolls with milk or an egg wash (1 egg beaten with 1 Tablespoon water).

Bake the rolls for 25 to 30 minutes, until they are golden brown on top. To check for doneness, use a digital thermometer inserted into the center of the middle roll to see if it is at least 190°F. If the rolls must cook longer, cover them with foil if they are very brown.

Remove rolls from the oven. Let them cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then transfer them to a rack to cool completely.

OM NOM NOM!

 

Bready or Not: Japanese Milk Bread Rolls

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Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

Posted by on Jan 25, 2017 in Blog, Bready or Not, yeast bread | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

These soft pretzel bites are bready perfection that fits in the palm of your hand.

Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

I first featured this recipe on my old LiveJournal back in 2012. It’s one I’ve continued to make a couple times a year in the years since. The recipe is reliable and delicious!

Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

If you’re intimidated by yeast dough, this is a good starter recipe. The dough comes together quite easily and it’s not persnickety to work with. I include directions for making it in a stand mixer and bread machine, but you can certainly make it by hand–it just takes some wrist work.

Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

You don’t need fancy ingredients for this, either. It doesn’t even call for bread flour. Mind you, if you do plan to make pretzels often, I highly recommend grabbing pretzel salt. Unlike kosher salt, it doesn’t absorb into the baked dough, but maintains its crystalline texture and great taste. (I’ve been working on a tub of this stuff for almost four years! It doesn’t go bad, so hey.)

Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

These pretzel bites taste best within a day of being made, but the fabulous thing is that these keep very well in the freezer. Just freeze them in a single layer on waxed paper, drop them in a gallon freezer bag, and ta-da! Pull out the whole bag or a few here and there when you need a pretzel bite fix over the next few weeks.

Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

Because trust me, these things are addictive.

Modified from Jamie Cooks It Up!

Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

These Soft Pretzel Bites are tender and delicious. They taste best if eaten within a day of baking, but they also keep well frozen for a few weeks.

  • Dough:
  • 1 1/2 cups warm water (90 to 100-degrees)
  • 2 Tb brown sugar
  • 1 Tb instant yeast
  • 6 Tb butter, melted
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 1/2-5 cups flour
  • Water bath:
  • 12 cups water
  • 3/4 cup baking soda
  • 1 egg, beaten until frothy
  • Pretzel salt or Kosher Salt

If making with a stand mixer

Pour 1 1/2 cups warm water into your mixer; use the standard paddle attachment. Add 6 tablespoons melted butter, 2 tablespoons brown sugar and 1 tablespoon instant yeast. Mix on low for 30 seconds or so. (If using active yeast, let it sit for about five minutes to get frothy.)

Add 2 1/2 teaspoons salt and 2 cups of the flour; put dough hook on mixer. Turn mixer to low and add the rest of the flour, 1 cup at a time as the mixer runs. The flour is adequate when the dough pulls itself away from the sides of the bowl.

Turn mixer to medium speed and let it knead for 5 minutes.

Remove bowl from stand and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise for 1 hour, or until doubled in size.

If making with a bread machine

Place ingredients in machine in specified order. In many, that means liquids first. Add in brown sugar, melted butter, salt, 4 1/2 cups flour, and yeast.

Set machine on a basic dough cycle. Monitor as it starts mixing and add more dough as needed to produce a soft, non-tacky dough; this will likely be 1/4 to 1/2 cup more. Let machine complete dough cycle and rise.

Now, regardless of how you start the dough

Rub counter space with butter or apply cooking spray, and likewise prepare two rimmed cookie sheets. Using a sharp knife or pizza cutter, slice the dough into eight equal portions. Let dough rest for 5 to 10 minutes.

While the dough is resting, pour 12 cups of water into a large pot; bring to a boil. Pour in 3/4 cup baking soda; it will get very frothy. Turn down the heat if necessary, keeping the water to a low boil.

Preheat oven at 425-degrees.

Return to the dough and roll each piece into a long rope. Cut each rope into little chunks about 2 inches wide.

Carefully drop the chunks into the boiling water. Let them boil for 1 minute. Do a dozen or so at a time.

Use a strainer or slotted spoon to remove dough pieces from the boiling water. Place pieces on the prepped cookie sheets. Continue until all the bites have had their bath.

Brush the beaten egg over the top of each dough piece and then sprinkle a bit of salt over the tops.

Bake the bites for 10-14 minutes or until golden brown. They cook fast, so keep an eye on them.

Let pans cool at least 10 minutes before you begin to indulge. Pretzels bites taste best eaten within a day, but can also be kept frozen for a few weeks and they thaw quickly. Eat at room temperature or slightly warmed.

OM NOM NOM!

 

Bready or Not: Soft Pretzel Bites

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Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

Posted by on Oct 12, 2016 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, pumpkin, yeast bread | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

Bready or Not is full-out bready this week with a recipe that produces two gorgeous braided loaves of pumpkin bread!

Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

This recipe from King Arthur Flour and was featured in their mailed catalog a while back. Like so many of their recipes, it’s an absolute winner.

Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

The pumpkin puree doesn’t make this bread tacky, even as dough. It incorporates well and adds light taste and vivid color. Diced candied ginger and raisins create variations in texture. The spices play well with everything. Actually, you should make this bread just to smell it as it bakes.

Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

The slices are divine, whether or not you add butter. It would also be delicious in something like bread pudding. YUM.

Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

Plus, it’s just plain pretty.

Modified from King Arthur Flour.

Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

This recipe yields two large loaves of luscious, braided ginger pumpkin bread! Make in a mixer or by hand; if making in a bread machine, add the ingredients in the order specified by your machine (likely liquids first) and add the raisins and candied ginger after the dough is well mixed. Baked loaves are delicious for days, kept well-wrapped, and can also be frozen. This is modified from a recipe at King Arthur Flour.

  • 4 1/2 cups bread flour
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 1 3/4 cups pumpkin (1 can, not organic)
  • 2 eggs, room temperature
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • 1/3 cup diced candied ginger
  • extra butter, to brush on bread

In the large bowl of a stand mixer, combine the flour, spices, sugar, ginger, salt, and yeast.

In a separate bowl, stir together the pumpkin, eggs and melted butter. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients. Continue to stir until the dough begins to come away from the sides of the bowl. Knead the dough for 2 minutes; let it rest for 15 minutes. Knead for an additional 5 to 7 minutes, or until it's smooth. Add the raisins and candied ginger, and continue kneading just until they're incorporated.

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover it with plastic wrap, and set it aside to rise for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, until about doubled.

Lightly grease a surface and turn out the dough onto it. Divide the dough in half, then divide each half into three pieces. Roll each piece into a 10-inch log.

Place three logs together on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Braid them together, making sure to pinch together the ends or tuck them underneath. Repeat the process with the other three logs on another baking sheet. Lightly cover them with plastic wrap and let them rise another hour. They should be puffy, not necessarily doubled in size.

Bake the loaves in a preheated 375-degree oven for 25 to 30 minutes, until lightly browned. A cake tester inserted in the center should come out clean. Brush butter over the loaves to give them a nice shine.

Let the braids cool on a wire rack. Serve them warm or at room temperature. Loaves can also be frozen for later enjoyment.

OM NOM NOM!

 

Bready or Not: Ginger Pumpkin Braided Bread

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Bready or Not: Soft Dinner Rolls

Posted by on Jun 29, 2016 in Blog, Bready or Not, side dish, yeast bread | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Soft Dinner Rolls

Back when I first started Bready or Not in 2011, one of my first recipes was for Soft Dinner Rolls. I’m featuring it again today because it’s still a family favorite, and one I make regularly.

Bready or Not: Soft Dinner Rolls

I used to be very intimidated by working with yeast. Would the dough rise? How would I know when it was ready? I used box mixes for a while and built up my confidence to handle the stuff from-scratch.

These soft rolls have never failed me. Other doughs are persnickety; this dough is not. The result is soft, and it bakes up into soft, luscious rolls.

Bready or Not: Soft Dinner Rolls

These are the rolls I make every year for Thanksgiving and Christmas. I can make them weeks in advance. They thaw fast. They keep for as long as six days in a sealed bag. Most importantly, they reheat and taste as fresh as ever (and can even be reheated another time, too).

If you’re shy about yeast rolls, give these a try! If you’ve already mastered yeast bread, add these to your repertoire–they are worth making again and again.

Bready or Not: Soft Dinner Rolls

On the subject of yeast, the only kind I use is SAF Instant Yeast. I store it in a sealed plastic tub in the freezer; the yeast granules don’t freeze, but the cold preserves the yeast.

Bready or Not: Soft Dinner Rolls

Bready or Not: Soft Dinner Rolls

A Bready or Not Original! This straightforward yeast roll recipe produces soft, tender dinner rolls. They keep for about a week in sealed bags, and can be frozen and reheated later with delicious results! Recipe makes 12 to 15 standard dinner rolls.

  • 1 cup warm water (110 degrees) (temperature especially important if mixing by hand)
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 packet of bread machine yeast OR 2 1/4 teaspoons of instant yeast

If making by hand: mix all ingredients together and knead until soft. Place the dough in a bowl and lightly cover with plastic wrap. Let dough rise 45 minutes to 1 hour; knead down again. Let rise another 45 minutes to 1 hour.

If making in a bread machine: add ingredients in the order specified. That often means the liquids first. Set the machine on dough cycle and start; this should run for about 2 hours.

Prepare a cookie sheet or jelly roll pan by greasing lightly with butter. When the dough is done, lightly flour a mat or flat surface. Gently flatten the dough with hands. It's so soft, a rolling pin isn't necessary. Use a biscuit cutter or other round shape to cut out rolls. Place them spaced out a bit on the pan; it should produce 12 to 15 rolls, depending on the cutter. Lightly cover pan with plastic wrap and let it sit for an hour, or until rolls have doubled in size.

Preheat oven at 350-degrees. Bake the rolls for 10 to 15 minutes, watching them for desired brownness. Let cool a few minutes before serving.

Completely cooled rolls can be frozen in gallon freezer bags for several months. Sealed rolls will keep well at room temperature for at least 6 days.

OM NOM NOM!

 

Bready or Not: Soft Dinner Rolls

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Bready or Not: Sour Cream Bread

Posted by on Feb 4, 2015 in Blog, Bready or Not, yeast bread | 4 comments

Make note: this recipe doesn’t make sourdough bread. Instead, it uses sour cream to create tender, delicious sandwich bread that isn’t the least bit sour.

sour cream bread

I always keep sour cream around. It’s often on sale, it keeps well, and I can use it for tacos, salads, or making this bread. I actually make this bread on an almost weekly basis.

sour cream bread

Different brands of sour cream have different consistency. That means you need to keep an eye on this in the mixing stage. If it looks lumpy, add more water. If it’s looser, add more flour.

This loaf bread may be finicky, but it’s worth the effort. The end result has that perfect fresh bread smell and soft texture. It makes your whole house smell cozy and happy, and does the very same to your belly.

sour cream bread

I originally found this recipe in a fabulous book, The Bread Lover’s Bread Machine Cookbook by Beth Hensperger.

Sour Cream Bread2_sm

Bready or Not: Sour Cream Bread

  • 1/2 cup plus 1 Tablespoon water
  • 1 cup sour cream (use nonstick spray on measuring cup)
  • 3 1/2 cups bread flour
  • 1 Tablespoon light brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons gluten
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast

If you're using a bread machine, add the ingredients in the recommended order and run on dough cycle or full bread mode. I prefer to do dough cycle and bake in the oven.

If you're using a stand mixer, blend water and sour cream. In a separate bowl, combine bread flour, brown sugar, gluten, salt, and yeast. Mix wet and dry ingredients together and knead with a dough hook.

!Either method: Keep an eye on the texture. If it's wet or too tacky, add more flour. If it's too lumpy or thick, splash in a tiny bit more water as needed.

Let dough rise until it has doubled, 1-2 hours. Grease or non-stick spray a bread pan.

Lightly grease a surface and dump your dough onto it. With your greased hands, form the dough into a loaf shape by gently folding. Set in the pan--or glop it in, and smooth it out (that's still a professional method, I think). Cover with lightly greased plastic wrap or a shower cap.

Let dough rise in a warm spot until it's crested to desired height, 30-60 minutes. Watch it.

Preheat oven to 350-degrees.

Bake bread for 20 minutes. Cover the top with foil to prevent heavy browning, then bake for an additional 15-20 minutes. When it's done, it'll sound hollow when tapped.

Remove bread from oven and hold it over a rack so it will gently drop out; use a spatula to carefully loosen it, if needed. If you want, you can brushed the top with some butter to soften the crust and give it a shine.

Let the bread cool at least 45 minutes before cutting. Also, you can let it cool completely and then wrap it several layers of plastic wrap before placing it in the freezer. Keeps well in freezer up to one month.

!OM NOM NOM.

sour cream bread

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