Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

Posted by on Dec 23, 2020 in Blog, Bready or Not, british, cheese galore, quick bread, side dish | 0 comments

Yorkshire puddings are what many Americans also know of as popovers–light, airy, crisp sponges perfect to eat with a roast and gravy!

Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

This recipe is for a small batch of puds. Since they are so airy (if they rise right), the six puddings of this recipe are perfect for two or three people.

Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

Cheese makes everything better, of course. I used Dubliner Irish Cheddar, as it is available at my nearest Costcos for a good price.

Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

Use a good quality cheddar here to really take these puddings to the next level.

Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

Modified from Bake from Scratch Magazine.

Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

These cheesy Yorkshire puds are perfect to serve with a holiday roast and gravy! Unlike many recipes, this makes a small batch of six puddings, enough for 2 or 3 people. These are light, airy, and oh-so-cheesy. Use the best cheddar you can find–you'll be able to taste the difference.
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: British
Keyword: cheese, quick bread
Servings: 2
Author: Beth Cato

Equipment

  • metal muffin pan
  • blender

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup milk or half & half
  • 2 large eggs room temperature
  • 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter melted, divided
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup quality cheddar cheese (25 grams), freshly grated
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons fresh chives chopped, plus more for garnish

Instructions

  • Preheat oven at 425-degrees.
  • In the container of a blender, place milk, eggs, 1 tablespoon melted butter, flour, and salt; process just until smooth. Let rest for 10 minutes.
  • In a small bowl, toss together grated cheese and chives.
  • Place a 12-cup muffin pan in oven for 5 minutes to preheat.
  • Remove muffin pan from oven, and quickly spoon the remaining 2 tablespoons melted butter into the 6 muffin cups that are being used. Return pan to oven for 2 minutes.
  • Remove pan from oven. Working fast, spoon or pour batter into buttered muffin cups, dividing as evenly as possible. Top each with a spoonful of cheese mixture.
  • Bake until puffed and golden brown, 15 to 18 minutes. Garnish with more chives, if desired. Serve immediately. Yorkshires are best fresh as they deflate after baking.

OM NOM NOM!

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    Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

    Posted by on Dec 16, 2020 in Blog, Bready or Not, cookies | 0 comments

    It’s my understanding that there are likely thousands of Lebkuchen recipes in the world, and here is mine.

    Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

    This traditional German Christmas cookie is like a gingerbread cookie, but is a lot more complex due to the spices used and the citrus mixed in.

    Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

    Even the glaze adds to that wonderfully fresh citrus flavor, as it has a bit of lemon juice mixed in.

    Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

    The only somewhat odd ingredient is chopped-up candied orange. I actually cut up a whole-slice version that Trader Joe’s sells at the holidays, but otherwise candied orange should be found near fruitcake ingredients at many grocery stores.

    Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

    Note that this cookie dough needs to chill for a full day. That gives the flour time to develop and for the spices to really do their thing.

    Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

    And trust me, you want their thing done. These are awesome cookies, sure to delight and surprise anyone who digs in.

    Modified from a recipe printed in Cooking Light Magazine, December 2008.

    Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

    This take on the classic German holiday cookie is packed with complex spices and citrusy notes. Note that the dough needs to chill for a full day prior to baking. The final result is firm and chewy when fresh, and after about two days, they firm up more but remain delicious.
    Course: Dessert, Snack
    Cuisine: German
    Keyword: cookies, gingerbread, holiday, lemon
    Author: Beth Cato

    Ingredients

    Cookies

    • 3/4 cup brown sugar packed
    • 1/2 cup honey
    • 1/4 cup unsalted butter half stick
    • 1/4 cup dark molasses
    • 2 teaspoons espresso powder
    • 1 large egg
    • 3/4 cup ground almonds sifted
    • 1/2 cup candied orange slices chopped, or candied orange peel
    • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 15.75 ounces
    • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
    • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
    • 1/8 teaspoon salt

    Glaze

    • 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
    • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons water

    Instructions

    • In a medium saucepan on medium heat, constantly stir together the brown sugar, honey, butter, and molasses until the sugar is dissolved. Make sure it doesn’t come to a boil. Transfer the mixture to large bowl and let it cool to room temperature.
    • Add the espresso powder and egg to the cool sugar mixture. Follow that up with the ground almonds and candied orange bits.
    • In a separate bowl, stir together the rest of the dry ingredients. Gradually combine the two bowls until just mixed. Lift it up and knead it for a minute or so to make sure no flour remains at the bottom.
    • Wrap dough in plastic wrap and stash in the fridge for at least a day.
    • Preheat oven at 325-degrees. Cover two large baking sheets with parchment paper.
    • Divide dough into 4 portions. Keep the other portions chilled while rolling 1 out into a 8×6-inch rectangle. Cut (a pizza slicer or bench knife are great) into 3×1-inch bars. Transfer to baking sheet, setting them an inch apart.
    • Bake for about 20 minutes, or until firm. If cooking both sheets at once, switch their positions about halfway through.
    • As soon as the cookies are out, mix up the glaze. Drizzle glaze back and forth over the warm cookies. Let glaze set for an hour before packing up cookies in sealed containers.

    OM NOM NOM!

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      Giftmas 2020: Help the Edmonton Food Bank!

      Posted by on Dec 15, 2020 in Blog, giftmas | 1 comment

      giftmas 2020

      I’m taking part in Giftmas again this year, an annual effort coordinated by Rhonda Parrish for the benefit of the Edmonton Food Bank. I don’t need to state the reasons why helping food banks is more important this year than ever before. We need to help each other. We can’t connect in person, but we can connect with a few bucks that will help fill bellies and add warmth to the world through kindness. If you’re American like me, your dollars will deliver extra bang with each buck, too. $1 = 3 meals.

      Please help.

      Rhonda asked Giftmas participants to post on the subject of connections. For me, this year has featured an evolving connection with my son.

      He turned fifteen in March. We didn’t get to do his annual birthday trip to IKEA, where he loves following the handout map and the big arrows on the floor, as he has since he was a preschooler. He’s autistic. He loves maps and numbers, and IKEA is all about those things.

      Last year, he started high school. It was not a transition without hiccups. He needs routine and quiet. He struggles to understood the chaos of other people. The lead-in to his birthday was the start of virtual high school. It was… tumultuous, to say the least. The kid who needs routine, losing all semblance of it. Me, I’m diagnosed OCD and not much better at handling this stuff than he is, but I have to be the cool-headed parent because if I crack, he will really crack.

      I’m also the at-home parent as I do this writer thing. I was the one who had to talk him through the fear, the unknowns. I had to talk myself through, too.

      As April chugged along, as masks became the thing, his school days began to find more of a groove. He did, too. He actually found it easier to focus on his work in the online school format. I enjoyed having him around, too, preparing lunch for him and checking in during breaks to see how things were going. It became a situation that bonded us more, as we talked at lunch about the new COVID-19 case numbers for the day and what they meant for our family.

      We’ve continued to work through, day by day, as his sophomore year began in the fall. He started out online, then got to return to school for two days a week for three weeks before an outbreak shut his school down in early November. Soon after that, rising case numbers for Arizona forced his entire district to return to online learning to finish out 2020. He’s handled these transitions oddly well. I’m proud of him. This year has been hard, but he has grown in this time. So have I.

      That said, I selfishly would like fewer growth-through-adversity moments in 2021, for our sakes and for everyone else, too.

      Please help other people end their 2020 and start the new year on a brighter note. Donate to the Edmonton Food Bank today.

      Thank you.

      Follow the entire blog tour through RhondaParrish.com and her social media.

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      Bready or Not Original: Honey Spritz Cookies

      Posted by on Dec 9, 2020 in Blog, Bready or Not, cookies | 0 comments

      These Honey Spritz Cookies are perfectly sweet, and with some added sanding sugar, will make cookie plates bright this holiday season!

      Bready or Not Original: Honey Spritz Cookies

      I have a love and hate relationship with my cookie press. Sometimes I try to use it for recipes and it is a disaster. Not so with this recipe!

      Bready or Not Original: Honey Spritz Cookies

      This dough was soft and dreamy to work with. I can only hope that you have a similar experience.

      Bready or Not Original: Honey Spritz Cookies

      As I used a tree-shaped disc to make my cookies, I added some green sanding sugar. The fun thing about this recipe is that you can make it any time of year and customize it to the season.

      Really, the most difficult thing about this recipe was rearranging my fridge to fit in the cookie sheets for their chill time.

      Bready or Not Original: Honey Spritz Cookies

      Use a cookie press to create delicious cookies! These treats are perfectly sweet.
      Course: Dessert, Snack
      Keyword: cookie press, cookies, holiday
      Servings: 40 cookies
      Author: Beth Cato

      Equipment

      • cookie press
      • 2 large cookie sheets

      Ingredients

      • 2 cups all-purpose flour
      • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
      • 1/4 teaspoon salt
      • 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 stick
      • 1/3 cup white sugar
      • 1 large egg room temperature
      • 1/4 cup honey
      • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
      • sanding sugar or coarse sugar or other edible decorations

      Instructions

      • Place two cookie sheets in fridge to completely chill.
      • Arrange oven racks at top and bottom of oven, then set to preheat at 350-degrees.
      • In a medium bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.
      • In a large mixing bowl, beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the egg, honey, and vanilla. Gradually add in the dry mixture until just combined. Dough will be super-soft.
      • Cookie presses vary in how they work–fill the device with dough, however required, and add decorative disk or nozzle. Press out cookie dough directly onto the cold cookie sheets, spacing 1-inch apart.
      • If desired, add colorful sanding sugar or other decorations. Bake for 7 minutes. Switch placement of cookie sheets within oven. Bake for another 7 minutes, until set. Let cool on pans for about 5 minutes then transfer to racks to completely cool.
      • Store in sealed containers at room temperature.

      OM NOM NOM!

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