cheese galore

Bready or Not Original: Bread Machine Cheesy Soft Dinner Rolls

Posted by on Nov 10, 2021 in Blog, Bready or Not, cheese galore, yeast bread | 0 comments

I upgraded my original Soft Dinner Roll recipe in the most Beth Cato way possible: I added loads of cheese!

Bready or Not Original: Bread Machine Cheesy Soft Dinner Rolls

I don’t simply mix cheese into the dough like with a standard cheesy roll or biscuit recipe. Nah, that’s too mundane. I tried a take on lamination–the French technique wherein butter is layered to create flaky layers in pastry. But with cheese.

Bready or Not Original: Bread Machine Cheesy Soft Dinner Rolls

It worked out, in a beautiful way. In these pictures, you see a fine Vermont Cheddar. I highly recommend using an orange cheese (Cheddar, or if you are blessed, something like Red Leicester) because the finished rolls look amazing. White Cheddar would be great for flavor, too, though it would blend in more.

Bready or Not Original: Bread Machine Cheesy Soft Dinner Rolls

I wrote this recipe for bread machines, but it would be easy to modify to make by hand. Just let the dough have an initial rise for about an hour, mix the first portion of cheese in, then let it rise again before the lamination stage.

Bready or Not Original: Bread Machine Cheesy Soft Dinner Rolls

Bready or Not Original: Bread Machine Cheesy Soft Dinner Rolls

A Bready or Not Original! This straightforward yeast roll recipe produces soft, tender dinner rolls layered with cheese. Choose an orange cheddar and the color will really pop in the final bake. Recipe makes 12 to 15 standard dinner rolls.
Course: Bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Keyword: cheese, yeast bread
Author: Beth Cato

Equipment

  • bread machine
  • jelly roll pan or baking sheet

Ingredients

  • 1 cup warm water about 110 degrees
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 Tablespoons white sugar
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons instant yeast or 1 packet instant yeast
  • 6 ounces cheddar cheese shredded

Instructions

  • Add ingredients EXCEPT cheese into the bread machine. That often means the liquids first. Set the machine on dough cycle and start; this should run for about 2 hours. Once the dough starts mixing, sprinkle in about half the cheese. If necessary–and if safely possible, dependent on the machine–use a spatula to press cheese into the dough. Let dough cycle continue until done.
  • Prepare a cookie sheet or jelly roll pan by greasing with butter or nonstick spray.
  • Pat out dough on an even lightly-greased surface. It’s time to add the rest of the cheese using a process roughly like French butter lamination.
  • Sprinkle a handful of cheese over the lower portion of dough. Fold top part over it, then fold dough the other way, creating a fat dough ball. Pat out dough again. Repeat process again one or two more times, until only a handful of cheese is left.
  • Pat out dough again. Use a small round cutter to slice out portions of dough. Place them in the prepared pan, spaced so they don’t quite touch. Sprinkle the remaining cheese on top. Cover pan with plastic wrap or a light towel and let rise again in a warm spot for 30 minutes to 1 hour, until rolls become puffy and double in size.
  • Preheat oven at 350-degrees.
  • Bake rolls for 15 to 22 minutes. If they begin to brown too much, cover with foil halfway through. Let rolls cool a few minutes before serving.
  • Completely cooled rolls can be frozen in gallon freezer bags for several months. Sealed rolls will keep well at room temperature for at least 6 days. They are good eaten at room temperature, but are best briefly warmed in the oven.

*OM NOM NOM!*

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    Bready or Not Original: Prosciutto-Parmesan Palmiers

    Posted by on Nov 3, 2021 in Blog, Bready or Not, cheese galore, pork, quick bread, side dish | 0 comments

    The holiday season is nigh, and these Prosciutto-Parmesan Palmiers are the perfect appetizer for a couple or an entire gang!

    Bready or Not Original: Prosciutto-Parmesan Palmiers

    These really have three ingredients, plus some flour for dusting a counter. They take minutes to assemble. Stash them in the freezer for hours or days. They bake up fast. They make bellies happy.

    Bready or Not Original: Prosciutto-Parmesan Palmiers

    Plus, I daresay, they are downright pretty. I love the layers in puff pastry! Here, those crisp buttery layers are fantastic along with shredded cheese and thin slices of prosciutto.

    Bready or Not Original: Prosciutto-Parmesan Palmiers

    Honestly, these are dangerous. It’s hard to eat just one.

    Bready or Not Original: Prosciutto-Parmesan Palmiers

    However, if you can exercise restraint, the leftovers are delicious. They can be eaten cold (the prosciutto is the prominent flavor then), but are better with a brief warm-up in the oven.

    Bready or Not Original: Prosciutto-Parmesan Palmiers

    Make these your go-to game day, holiday event, or date night treat!

    Bready or Not Original: Prosciutto-Parmesan Palmiers

    This three-ingredient convenient and tasty appetizer can be prepared hours in advance and bakes up fast once company arrives. Plus, if there are any leftovers, they are still delicious!
    Course: Appetizer
    Keyword: cheese, pork, puff pastry
    Author: Beth Cato

    Equipment

    • parchment paper
    • knife

    Ingredients

    • flour to dust surface
    • 1 sheet puff pastry (half a box) thawed in fridge
    • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan packed
    • 2 to 3 ounces sliced prosciutto

    Instructions

    • Hours or days before baking day: Sprinkle flour on a flat, clean surface. Roll out the puff pastry to make a 12-inch square. Cut in half. Sprinkle cheese over both halves. Place prosciutto slices to completely cover cheese; if there is extra meat, layer on the additional pieces. Roll the short sides of each piece of pastry together to meet in the middle–from the end, it will look rather like a number 3. Repeat this with the other half.
    • Encase both logs in plastic wrap and freeze until firm, at least an hour, but as long as several days.
    • Preheat oven at 400-degrees. Prepare a large baking sheet with parchment paper.
    • Pull out frozen logs to thaw for just a few minutes. While it is still mostly frozen, slice into 1/4-inch pieces and place spaced out on parchment. (Note that the end pieces may be sparse on filling and not presentable for company, but still worth baking up for private enjoyment.)
    • Bake for 12 to 15 minutes until palmiers are golden brown and puffed. They are best eaten fresh, but leftovers can be refrigerated. They are okay cold, but better toasted briefly again in the oven.

    OM NOM NOM!

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      Bready or Not Original: Easy Italian Meatballs

      Posted by on Sep 8, 2021 in beef, Blog, Bready or Not, cheese galore, main dish | 0 comments

      Everyone probably has their own take on classic Italian Meatballs. This is mine!

      What I love about the recipe is that it, 1) tastes good, and 2) is convenient. I can mix the meatballs up ahead of time and stash them in the fridge or even the freezer. They can be cooked straight from the freezer, too! Just cook them a little longer.

      Bready or Not Original: Easy Italian Meatballs

      I always go with 93% lean ground beef, but use whatever kind you want–even do a meat of beef and pork or ground sausage. Consider this recipe a template. Mix it up, switch out or increase seasonings, whatever.

      Bready or Not Original: Easy Italian Meatballs

      These are great with all kinds of dishes, too. Use them with the standard spaghetti or other Italian pasts, or on zoodles, or with sauce on some submarine sandwich bread. They are even good heated up, eaten by themselves!

      Bready or Not Original: Easy Italian Meatballs

      These gigantic meatballs are easy to make. If you want, form them early in the day and stash them in the fridge. Meatballs can also be frozen, cooked or cooked, and heated up later–and they can be taken straight from the freezer, too; just add a few more minutes to the cook time. This is also a great recipe to double to feed a crowd.
      Course: Main Course
      Cuisine: American, Italian
      Keyword: beef, cheese
      Servings: 8 meatballs
      Author: Beth Cato

      Equipment

      • food scale
      • 9×13 dish or large rimmed baking pan

      Ingredients

      • 2 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus extra for pan and hands
      • 2 large eggs
      • 1 1/2 cups panko
      • 1/2 cup milk or water
      • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
      • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
      • 1/2 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
      • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
      • 1 ounce Parmesan or Grana Padano, freshly grated, roughly 1/2 cup
      • 1 pound ground beef

      Instructions

      • Move rack to top third of oven and start to preheat at 425-degrees. Rub or brush a 9×13 casserole pan or rimmed baking sheet with oil.
      • In a large bowl, use a big spoon to mash together the 2 Tablespoons oil, eggs, panko, liquid, salt, pepper, seasoning, garlic powder, and cheese. The goal is to create a smooth paste. Add a handful of meat. Mix in, and gradually drop in the rest of the meat to thoroughly combine.
      • Use a food scale to weigh the meat, then divide that total by 8 (or any other desired increment). With oiled hands, press together meatballs, weighing each to create ones of equal size.
      • Bake meatballs for 20 minutes. Use a metal spatula to carefully flip over each for the browned-bottom is on top. Bake for another 6 to 10 minutes, until meatballs are fully browned. An instant read thermometer plunged into one should read over 160-degrees.
      • Serve as desired. Leftovers are great to refrigerate or freeze.

      OM NOM NOM!

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        Bready or Not: Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake

        Posted by on Jul 14, 2021 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, cake, cheese galore, nutty | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake

        This Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake is more cake than cheesecake, and is all sweet, fruity goodness.

        Bready or Not: Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake

        If you need a showstopper cake for a brunch or dessert, this one is perfect. It’s great to make ahead of time, too–slices can even be frozen for later, no prob!

        Bready or Not: Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake

        I used Murray’s Spiced Cherry Preserves; that little kick of spice was fantastic in the cake. Other bold preserves would be great in this cake, too–raspberry, strawberry, blueberry, even tropical flavors.

        Bready or Not: Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake

        This is a thick, rich cake. It tastes best when you get a bit of all the layers in a single bite: the sliced almonds, crumb topping, fruit, cream cheese, sponge.

        Bready or Not: Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake

        My husband liked the cake cold but he liked it even more when warmed a bit–and not in the microwave, either, but gently brought to room temperature by letting a slice sit out for 30 to 45 minutes.

        Bready or Not: Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake

        Don’t forget a slice on the counter, though. This does contain cream cheese and shouldn’t be left out for hours!

        Modified from Taste of Home Magazine December 2015.

        Bready or Not: Cherry-Almond Coffee Cake

        This is more cake than cheesecake, but it includes cream cheese, too, plus luscious layers of fruit and crumb topping. Feel free to experiment with different quality preserves--this would be delicious in a multitude of variations.
        Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
        Keyword: almond, cake, cheese, cherries, cream cheese, springform pan
        Author: Beth Cato

        Equipment

        • 9-inch springform pan
        • parchment paper

        Ingredients

        • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
        • 1 cup white sugar divided
        • 3/4 cup cold unsalted butter cubed
        • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
        • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
        • 1/4 teaspoon salt
        • 1 cup vanilla yogurt or sour cream, 8 ounces
        • 2 large eggs
        • 1 teaspoon almond extract
        • 8 ounces cream cheese 1 box, softened
        • 1 cup cherry preserves
        • 1/2 cup slices almonds

        Instructions

        • Preheat oven at 350-degrees. Cut a parchment round to fit the bottom of the springform pan. Apply nonstick spray or butter on bottom of sides of pan, add the parchment, then grease it as well.
        • In a big bowl, mix flour with 3/4 cup of sugar. Cut in butter until it is crumbly. Measure out 1/2 cup crumb mixture for topping; set aside.
        • To the bulk of the flour mix, add baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Stir in yogurt, 1 egg, and almond extract, until blended. Spread batter onto bottom of the springform pan.
        • In a small bowl, beat together the softened cream cheese, the remaining 1/4 cup sugar, and egg, to make it as smooth as possible. It's okay if it still has some clumps. Pour it onto the pan and smooth out. Spoon the preserves all across the top. Sprinkle with the reserved crumb topping and the sliced almonds.
        • Bake for 50 to 60 minutes. The middle should no longer be jiggly, the top a nice golden brown. Cool on a wire rack for 10 to 15 minutes then unlatch and life away the pan's ring to let the cake cool for another hour. Then place cake in fridge to complete set and cool for a few hours.
        • Cake can be eaten cold or after slices are brought to room temperature after about 30 to 45 minutes. Do remember to store cake in the fridge, as it does contain cream cheese! Slices can also be individually wrapped and frozen, and will thaw in the fridge with no issue.

        OM NOM NOM!

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          Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

          Posted by on Apr 28, 2021 in alcohol, bacon, Blog, boozy, Bready or Not, cheese galore, gluten-free, main dish, pork, side dish | Comments Off on Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

          This Pancetta Risotto is a fantastic meal for two people, or a delicious side for a group. It’s time-consuming but very straightforward to make.

          Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

          I confess, I spent years being intimidated by the very idea of a risotto. I would see it done on cooking shows. So much stirring! When I finally got up the gumption to give it a try, I found risotto wasn’t hard at all. It really is about lots of stirring.

          Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

          This recipe here is my fancy occasion recipe, especially when I have some good pancetta on hand, such as the kind carried by Smoking Goose Meatery out of Indianapolis.

          Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

          As for the wine, I’ve tried this with fancier Sauvignon Blanc from Total Wine (Cloudy Bay from New Zealand) as well as a $6 Trader Joe’s Coastal Sauvignon Blanc. Both versions turned out great! You don’t need to go all-out, but get something that is (hopefully) drinkable with the finished meal.

          Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

          Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

          Homemade risotto requires time standing at the stove, but makes for delicious results. This recipe takes about 45 minutes to an hour to completion, depending on your stove. Note that a small amount of bacon can be substituted for the pancetta, but it is much stronger in flavor and colors the risotto brown.
          Course: Main Course, pork
          Cuisine: Italian
          Keyword: alcohol, cheese, pork, rice
          Author: Beth Cato

          Equipment

          • large stock pot
          • medium saucepan

          Ingredients

          • 8 oz pancetta diced
          • 1 Tablespoon dried shallots or fresh shallot, finely minced
          • 3 cloves garlic minced
          • 1 1/4 cups Arborio rice
          • 1 cup dry white wine Sauvignon Blanc works well
          • 4 cups chicken broth or chicken stock, equal to a 32 oz box or 2 cans
          • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan or Pecorino Romano or Grana Padano, plus more to top rice
          • salt and pepper to taste

          Instructions

          • In a large stock pot, cook the pancetta for 10 to 12 minutes, until it starts to turn brown and crispy. At the same time, on another stove burner, use a medium sauce pan to bring the chicken broth to a very low simmer.
          • Use a slotted spoon to transfer pancetta to a paper towel-lined plate; set aside. Add dry shallots and garlic to the fat in the big pot. Sauté for two minutes. Add the Arborio rice and a pinch of salt. Sauté another 2 minutes, until the rice looks glossy with translucent edges.
          • Add the white wine and stir until it is absorbed. Add chicken broth in 1/2 cup increments, stirring well after each addition until it is absorbed. After about 12 to 15 minutes, when most of the broth has been added, begin to taste the rice. The goal is a chewy, al dente consistency. Add more broth as needed, and remember to turn off the burner for the broth pot when it is empty.
          • When the rice is creamy and al dente, stir in the pancetta and cheese. Taste the risotto again, adding more salt and pepper as needed. Serve with the remaining white wine.

          OM NOM NOM!

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            Bready or Not: Cheddar Beer Bread Rolls

            Posted by on Apr 14, 2021 in alcohol, Blog, Bready or Not, cheese galore, yeast bread | 2 comments

            These Cheddar Beer Bread Rolls taste as good as they look. Seriously.

            Bready or Not: Cheddar Beer Bread Rolls

            When the pandemic sent everything topsy-turvy in spring 2020, my husband ended up working from home more often. That meant I needed to feed him more often.

            Bready or Not: Cheddar Beer Bread Rolls

            So, like so many people, I started baking more bread. These rolls were among the first of my experiments, and they were a major hit.

            Bready or Not: Cheddar Beer Bread Rolls

            The original recipe from New York Times Cooking made a huge batch of rolls. I needed enough rolls to feed one guy, with a extras frozen for later.

            Bready or Not: Cheddar Beer Bread Rolls

            I rewrote the recipe to delicious results. I used a Guilt Lifter beer to make these, which lent a refreshing hoppy flavor. A heavier and darker beer will create heavier and darker flavor. Try different beers to suit your tastes and match your meal.

            Bready or Not: Cheddar Beer Bread Rolls

            Make a batch of about a dozen cheesy rolls with this straightforward yeast bread recipe! Beer lends some hoppy flavor to the dough, along with a boost of yeast. These rolls are fantastic fresh, but can also be frozen and heated up later for a delicious side dish. This recipe is halved and otherwise modified from a New York Times Cooking recipe.
            Course: Bread
            Cuisine: American
            Keyword: alcohol, beer, cheese, yeast bread
            Servings: 12 rolls
            Author: Beth Cato

            Equipment

            • 2 8-or 9-inch cake pans
            • 2.5-inch round cutter
            • plastic wrap
            • basting brush

            Ingredients

            • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter divided
            • 3 cups all-purpose flour or bread flour
            • 1/2 Tablespoons instant yeast
            • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
            • 2 Tablespoons honey
            • 1 cup beer room temperature
            • 1 cup shredded cheese 120 grams

            Instructions

            • Divide the two tablespoons of butter in half, separating them to soften at room temperature.
            • In a stand mixer with a bread hook attachment, stir together the flour, yeast, and salt. Follow up with 1 tablespoon of softened butter, honey, and beer. Mix on low speed for 4 minutes, scraping the bowl as needed. Increase the speed to medium for another 2 minutes, pulling the dough from the hook a few times. Add about half the cheese, reserving the rest to go on top later. Mix the cheese until it's distributed through the dough.
            • Lightly grease a large bowl. Transfer the dough there and cover with plastic wrap or a towel to let it rise until it's about doubled in size, about an hour.
            • Grease the two cake pans. Prepare a lightly floured surface and tip the dough onto it. Pat the dough out into a thick, even layer. Use the cutter to slice out rolls. Place them not quite touching in the pans. Reform scraps as much as possible to shape into more rolls. The rolls likely won't quite fill both pans.
            • Cover pans with plastic wrap and set in a warm place to rise again for 35 to 45 minutes. They may not increase a lot in size, but they should look puffy.
            • Preheat oven at 400-degrees.
            • Pull out remaining pat of butter and cheese. Brush the soft butter over the rolls, and follow up with a sprinkling of cheese. Try to keep the cheese from touching the edge of the pan, where it could burn.
            • Place both pans in the oven and bake until the rolls are browned and cheese is melted, 15 to 20 minutes. A digital thermometer in a center roll should read 190-degrees at minimum.
            • Let cool for at least 10 minutes before (carefully) pulling apart and serving.
            • Rolls can keep in a sealed bag at room temperature for up to 2 days. They can also be frozen and thawed for later enjoyment. They taste best hot. For best results, wrap them in foil and bake at 400 for about 10 minutes to warm them through.

            OM NOM NOM!

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