boozy

Bready or Not Original: Apple-Frangipane Galette

Posted by on Oct 13, 2021 in apples, Blog, boozy, Bready or Not, breakfast, French, nutty, pie | 0 comments

This Apple-Frangipane Galette is like a leaner apple pie. It’s the way to enjoy a sweet treat without going full overkill.

Bready or Not Original: Apple-Frangipane Galette

This recipe has a lot of ingredients and steps, but they can be spread out over a few days, if you want. The actual recipe is pretty straightforward!

Bready or Not Original: Apple-Frangipane Galette

I’ve been doing a number of recipes that use frangipane, and I get asked almost every time: “what is frangipane?”

Bready or Not Original: Apple-Frangipane Galette

To quote Wikipedia, it’s: “a sweet almond-flavored custard used in a variety of ways including cakes and… pastries. …Today it is normally made of butter, sugar, eggs, and ground almonds.”

Bready or Not Original: Apple-Frangipane Galette

In other words, it’s a spreadable, sweet, nutty layer of goodness. It acts as the perfect complement to apples in this recipe.

Bready or Not Original: Apple-Frangipane Galette

Do note that this is best enjoyed the day it is made. It’s fine, though, to freeze slices of it right away. When you thaw them later, enjoy the pieces that same day!

Bready or Not Original: Apple-Frangipane Galette

This Apple-Frangipane Galette is like a lighter, thinner version of apple pie, made all the better by the rich-almond filling beneath the apples. Note that this should be eaten the day it is made, but it can also be frozen to be eaten later.
Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: French
Keyword: almond, apple, pie
Author: Beth Cato

Equipment

  • parchment paper
  • food processor
  • pastry brush

Ingredients

Crust:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour plus more for dusting
  • 4 teaspoons white sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 6 Tablespoons cold unsalted butter cut into small pieces
  • 1 large egg

Frangipane:

  • 2/3 cup almond flour sifted to remove lumps
  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tablespoon unsalted butter room temperature
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 Tablespoon apple brandy such as Calvados (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon apple pie spice
  • pinch salt

Apple filling:

  • 2 medium apples such as Honeycrisp or Golden Delicious
  • 1 Tablespoon brown sugar packed
  • 1 Tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon apple pie spice
  • 1 large egg beaten
  • turbinado or other coarse sugar

Glaze:

  • 2 Tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons apple brandy such as Calvados

Instructions

Make the crust:

  • In a food processor, pulse together the flour, sugar, and salt. Add the butter and chop until it’s pea-sized. Add the egg and pulse until it comes together; if it doesn’t, add tiny drizzles of water until it does–just make sure the dough ends up cohesive, not wet. Turn out the dough onto a big piece of plastic wrap and compress the dough to form a disc. Wrap it up and chill it in fridge for a few hours, minimum, or a few days.

Make the frangipane:

  • Use a rubber spatula to combine the almond flour, sugar, flour, butter, egg, apple brandy, vanilla, pie spice and salt, making it smooth. Stash it in the fridge until ready to use.

Assembling the galette:

  • Preheat oven at 400-degrees. Prepare a big cookie sheet with a piece of parchment. Bring out the dough to warm for a few minutes, then lightly flour a surface and roll it out to about a 12-inch round. Move it to the parchment paper.
  • Spread the frangipane over the dough, leaving a blank 1 1/2-inch border. Set the baking sheet in the fridge while preparing the apples.

Prepare the apples:

  • Peel the apples and slice to 1/4-inch thickness. In another bowl, stir together the brown sugar, sugar, lemon juice, and pie spice. Add this to the apples, and toss them to coat. Bring out the galette dough. Arrange the apples on the frangipane starting from the middle, spiraling them outward while slightly overlapping them. Fold the blank edge over the apples to form a thin, pleated crust. Brush the beaten egg over the crust, then sprinkle it with coarse sugar.
  • Bake galette for 35 to 40 minutes. Apples in middle should be fork-tender when done. Cool for about 30 minutes.

Make the glaze:

  • In a small saucepan on the stovetop or in a microwave-safe bowl in the microwave, warm the honey and brandy until it is loose and spreadable. Using a clean pastry brush, brush glaze over the apples.
  • Let galette cool another 30 minutes, minimum, before cutting it–a pizza slicer is great for this. The galette is best eaten the day it is made, or promptly frozen in slices to be eaten soon after it thaws.

OM NOM NOM!

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    Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

    Posted by on Apr 28, 2021 in alcohol, bacon, Blog, boozy, Bready or Not, cheese galore, gluten-free, main dish, pork, side dish | Comments Off on Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

    This Pancetta Risotto is a fantastic meal for two people, or a delicious side for a group. It’s time-consuming but very straightforward to make.

    Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

    I confess, I spent years being intimidated by the very idea of a risotto. I would see it done on cooking shows. So much stirring! When I finally got up the gumption to give it a try, I found risotto wasn’t hard at all. It really is about lots of stirring.

    Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

    This recipe here is my fancy occasion recipe, especially when I have some good pancetta on hand, such as the kind carried by Smoking Goose Meatery out of Indianapolis.

    Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

    As for the wine, I’ve tried this with fancier Sauvignon Blanc from Total Wine (Cloudy Bay from New Zealand) as well as a $6 Trader Joe’s Coastal Sauvignon Blanc. Both versions turned out great! You don’t need to go all-out, but get something that is (hopefully) drinkable with the finished meal.

    Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

    Bready or Not Original: Pancetta Risotto

    Homemade risotto requires time standing at the stove, but makes for delicious results. This recipe takes about 45 minutes to an hour to completion, depending on your stove. Note that a small amount of bacon can be substituted for the pancetta, but it is much stronger in flavor and colors the risotto brown.
    Course: Main Course, pork
    Cuisine: Italian
    Keyword: alcohol, cheese, pork, rice
    Author: Beth Cato

    Equipment

    • large stock pot
    • medium saucepan

    Ingredients

    • 8 oz pancetta diced
    • 1 Tablespoon dried shallots or fresh shallot, finely minced
    • 3 cloves garlic minced
    • 1 1/4 cups Arborio rice
    • 1 cup dry white wine Sauvignon Blanc works well
    • 4 cups chicken broth or chicken stock, equal to a 32 oz box or 2 cans
    • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan or Pecorino Romano or Grana Padano, plus more to top rice
    • salt and pepper to taste

    Instructions

    • In a large stock pot, cook the pancetta for 10 to 12 minutes, until it starts to turn brown and crispy. At the same time, on another stove burner, use a medium sauce pan to bring the chicken broth to a very low simmer.
    • Use a slotted spoon to transfer pancetta to a paper towel-lined plate; set aside. Add dry shallots and garlic to the fat in the big pot. Sauté for two minutes. Add the Arborio rice and a pinch of salt. Sauté another 2 minutes, until the rice looks glossy with translucent edges.
    • Add the white wine and stir until it is absorbed. Add chicken broth in 1/2 cup increments, stirring well after each addition until it is absorbed. After about 12 to 15 minutes, when most of the broth has been added, begin to taste the rice. The goal is a chewy, al dente consistency. Add more broth as needed, and remember to turn off the burner for the broth pot when it is empty.
    • When the rice is creamy and al dente, stir in the pancetta and cheese. Taste the risotto again, adding more salt and pepper as needed. Serve with the remaining white wine.

    OM NOM NOM!

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      Bready or Not Original: Apple Calvados Galette

      Posted by on Nov 4, 2020 in alcohol, apples, Blog, boozy, Bready or Not, breakfast, French, pie | Comments Off on Bready or Not Original: Apple Calvados Galette

      This Apple Calvados Galette is a perfect dessert for one or two people. Plus, it’s rustic and pretty to behold!

      Bready or Not Original: Apple Calvados Galette

      Calvados is an apple brandy made in Normandy. The price point of it can vary quite a bit. Feel free to use another kind of apple brandy in the recipe.

      Bready or Not Original: Apple Calvados Galette

      The delicious, original aspect of this treat is that you use the calvados to make a quick stovetop jelly that you then coat the apples with at the end of the bake time.

      Bready or Not Original: Apple Calvados Galette

      The alcohol flavor doesn’t linger. What you get is a concentrated sweet flavor of apples, right atop the fresh apples.

      or Not Original: Apple Calvados Galette

      The baked galette keeps for days wrapped up in foil in the fridge. A quarter slice is the perfect amount for breakfast or dessert, and it’s not anywhere near as bready and dense as a full piece of pie.

      Bready or Not Original: Apple Calvados Galette

      This Apple Calvados Galette evokes the yummy goodness of apple pie, but in a more rustic, simple form. This is the perfect dessert for one or two people! If French calvados isn’t available, use another apple brandy.
      Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
      Cuisine: French
      Keyword: alcohol, apple, pie
      Author: Beth Cato

      Equipment

      • baking sheet
      • parchment paper
      • basting brush

      Ingredients

      Galette

      • 1 single-layer pie dough store-bought or homemade
      • 4 medium apples such as Gala, Fuji, and Ambrosia
      • 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
      • 1/3 cup calvados or other apple brandy
      • 1 Tablespoon cornstarch
      • 3 Tablespoons brown sugar packed
      • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

      Glaze

      • 1 Tablespoon pure maple syrup
      • 1 Tablespoon maple sugar or turbinado sugar

      Instructions

      • Preheat oven at 400-degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
      • On a lightly floured surface, roll out the pie crust to about a 10-inch diameter circle. Transfer it to the baking sheet and set in fridge while the other ingredients are prepared.
      • Peel, core, and thinly slice the apples, placing them in a large bowl. Pour in the lemon juice, calvados, cornstarch, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Toss the apples to coat them completely.
      • Pull out the chilled crust. Begin to arrange apple slices in the middle, fanning them out and stacking them, but leaving a 2-inch border of dough around the outside. DO NOT DISCARD THE LIQUID IN THE BOWL! Once the apples are arranged, fold the dough over to partially cover the apples.
      • Start baking the galette for 15 minutes. While that is cooking, pour the leftover liquid into a small pot on medium-high. Stay close to the stove and stir liquid often. As soon as it gels, which is right at right about boiling temperature, remove it from heat. Set aside.
      • Reduce oven temperature to 350-degrees. Bake galette for another 20 minutes.
      • Pull out the galette. Drizzle the gel over the exposed apples in the middle of the galette then use basting brush to coat every nook and cranny. Measure out maple syrup. Use same brush (no need to wash it) to coat the top crust, then sprinkle maple sugar or coarse sugar over it to add a crystalline crunch.
      • Bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, until apples in middle are fork-tender.
      • Let cool slightly before cutting–a pizza cutter is ideal. Leftovers can be kept wrapped up in foil in the fridge for days.

      *OM NOM NOM!*

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        Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        Posted by on Oct 7, 2020 in Blog, boozy, Bready or Not, nutty, pie, pumpkin | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        This Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie is FANCY. It looks fancy, and let me assure you, it tastes fancy.

        Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        I’m relieved that the results are amazing, because honestly, this is the most complicated pumpkin pie recipe I have ever made.

        Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        I’m used to the basic, yummy Libby’s pie. This pie is substantially more intimidating, but doable.

        Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        I found the original recipe in the November 2019 issue of Bon Appetit. I do not like how the original recipe is written. It’s confusing at several points. Therefore, I largely rewrote it, creating what (I hope) is a more straightforward version.

        Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        But it is still complicated. I suggest making the pie crust a day ahead, just to avoid dirtying everything all at once.

        Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        The end result is a pumpkin pie with a custard that is delicately firm and soft, with nuanced spices that perfectly complement the candied pecans on top.

        Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        This is a pie to make to impress people. Truly, this is a Bake Off showstopper kind of pie.

        Recipe heavily rewritten from original in Bon Appetit November 2019.

        Bready or Not: Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie

        This Pecan-Whiskey Pumpkin Pie is a true showstopper. No denying it--this is a complex pie recipe, but one with gorgeous, delicious results.
        Course: Dessert
        Cuisine: American
        Keyword: pecans, pie, pumpkin
        Author: Beth Cato

        Equipment

        • deep dish pie pan
        • parchment paper
        • pie weights
        • immersion blender or blender

        Ingredients

        Crust

        • 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
        • 1 Tablespoon white sugar
        • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
        • 3/4 cup unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks) cold, cut into pieces
        • 3/4 cup ice water
        • 1 large egg white reserve yolk to use in pie filling

        Pecan Topping

        • 1 1/2 cups whole pecans
        • 2 Tablespoons brown sugar packed
        • pinch kosher salt
        • 1 Tablespoon unsalted butter melted
        • 1 Tablespoon pure maple syrup

        Pumpkin Pie

        • 3 large eggs
        • 1 egg yolk
        • 15 oz pure pumpkin puree
        • 3/4 cup heavy cream
        • 1/4 cup white sugar
        • 2 Tablespoons rye whiskey
        • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
        • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
        • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
        • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
        • pinch ground cloves
        • 6 Tablespoons brown sugar packed
        • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter melted
        • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

        Instructions

        Make the crust

        • Note that the dough can be made as days in advance and kept chilled. The crust can also be baked a day or two before the pie is finished; keep it covered at room temperature in the meantime.
        • Whisk together flour, sugar, and salt. Add butter and coat it with flour, then use fingers to press butter into shaggy pieces of varying sizes. Drizzle in about 5 Tablespoons of cold water and knead it into flour. Add additional small increments of water until dough just starts to come together. There should still be visible pieces of butter.
        • Dump dough onto a clean, lightly-floured surface and knead a few more times to work in any dry, shaggy bits. Form the dough into an even, broad disc and encase in plastic wrap. Tuck inside fridge to chill for at least 30 minutes, or up to 3 days.
        • To blind-bake crust, preheat oven at 400-degrees.
        • On a floured surface, roll out dough to make about an even 12-inch round. Loop it over the rolling pin to lift it onto a deep dish pie plate. Shape it into pan. Form the crust edge as desired and trim away any excess dough.
        • Line the inside of the crust with parchment paper. Fill entire crust with pie weights, such as dry beans.
        • Bake until the edges of the crust start to brown, about 20 minutes. Use parchment to lift out pie weights and set aside to cool--do so with great care!
        • Decrease the oven temperature to 350-degrees, and continue to bake for another 20 to 25 minutes. While it is baking, separate an egg; place the white in a bowl and beat it slightly, and reserve the yolk in fridge to use for the pie filling.
        • Remove crust from oven. Immediately brush a tablespoon of egg white over the bottom, which will help it resist going soggy once the filling is added. Return crust to oven for another 5 to 10 minutes. Reserve the remaining egg white for use in the pie.
        • At this point, the recipe can proceed to the filling stage, or the crust can cool completely and be covered to sit at room temperature for a few days.

        Filling

        • Heat oven at 350-degrees; set a baking sheet inside oven at heat up, too.
        • While mixing the filling ingredients, toast the pecans on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet for about 8 to 10 minutes, stirring them once at the halfway point. The pecan should be a little darker and fragrant.
        • If using an immersion blender, combine the following ingredients in an even-bottomed large pot (a slow cooker pot works for this) or use a large blender (in two batches, if needed). Combine eggs, egg yolk, pumpkin puree, heavy cream, and white sugar. Add the whiskey, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cardamom, cloves, 6 Tablespoons brown sugar, 2 Tablespoons melted butter, and kosher salt. Blend until smooth.
        • Pour into crust and bake until the filling is puffed and mostly set--a little wobble is okay--about 40 to 45 minutes.
        • While that is finishing up, coat the pecans. Pull out the leftover egg white and whisk in 2 Tablespoons brown sugar and kosher salt. Add maple syrup and Tablespoon of melted butter, stirring until just combined. Add the pecans and toss to coat.
        • Carefully use baking sheet to bring out the pie. Use a slotted spoon to add the pecans on top of the pumpkin, letting the excess egg white slurry stay in the bowl.
        • Return pie to oven. Bake until filling is completely set, until a butter knife stabbed into center (avoiding pecans) comes out clean. This can take anywhere from 10 to 30 minutes. If necessary, cover the edge of crust with foil to prevent overbrowning.
        • Let pie cool at least 2 hours before cutting in, chilling first if desired. Store pie loosely covered by foil at room temperature or in fridge.

        OM NOM NOM!

           

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          It’s fruitcake-making time!

          Posted by on Sep 16, 2019 in alcohol, Blog, boozy, Bready or Not, cake | Comments Off on It’s fruitcake-making time!

          Bready or Not Original: Mini Fruitcake Loaves

          Yes, the subject line is serious, because YES, fruitcake can be delicious–especially if you make it yourself and control the whole process! Follow my Mini Fruitcake Loaves recipe and you’ll see what I mean. Bake these babies now and you’ll have plenty of time to ripen them (that means brushing them down with a simple sugar mix once a week to soak in flavor) in time for holiday festivities.

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          Bready or Not Original: Iron-Skillet Apple Pie with Ginger Liqueur

          Posted by on Aug 21, 2019 in alcohol, apples, Blog, boozy, Bready or Not, pie | Comments Off on Bready or Not Original: Iron-Skillet Apple Pie with Ginger Liqueur

          A trusty cast iron skillet bakes up a beautiful apple pie in this delicious recipe.

          Bready or Not Original: Iron-Skillet Apple Pie with Ginger Liqueur

          This pie is also special because it includes a drizzle of ginger liqueur. I posted a recipe a few weeks ago on how to make a cheap, sublime version at home in under a week.

          Bready or Not Original: Iron-Skillet Apple Pie with Ginger Liqueur

          The ginger liqueur does add some lovely nuance to this pie, too–the complexity and freshness come across in a different way than, say, using some lemon juice on the sliced apples as I sometimes do to prevent them from browning.

          Bready or Not Original: Iron-Skillet Apple Pie with Ginger Liqueur

          The whole process of this recipe is pretty neat, too. The biggest dose of sweetness is actually at the bottom of the pie, as butter and brown sugar are baked into the bottom crust!

          Bready or Not Original: Iron-Skillet Apple Pie with Ginger Liqueur

          I had to make this recipe three times to finally figure out the right balance of ingredients and how best to bake it. The second try was the most disastrous, as I ended up with the dreaded soggy bottom.

          soggy bottom

          Do be sure to follow the advice to use a rimmed cookie sheet in the oven. It’ll catch the overflow from the skillet and save you from suffering a soggy bottom.

          Bready or Not Original: Iron-Skillet Apple Pie with Ginger Liqueur

           

          Click here for my Homemade Ginger Liqueur Recipe

           

          Bready or Not Original: Iron-Skillet Apple Pie with Ginger Liqueur

          Use a large iron skillet to bake up a delicious apple pie! Ginger liqueur adds complex flavor and elevates this beyond the average pie.
          Course: Dessert
          Keyword: alcohol, apple, pie
          Author: Beth Cato

          Ingredients

          Skillet base:

          • 1/4 cup unsalted butter half cube
          • 1/2 cup brown sugar packed

          Pie:

          • 2 prepared rounds of piecrust dough bought or made
          • 1/4 cup white sugar
          • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
          • 2 teaspoons flour
          • 5 Granny Smith and/or Honeycrisp apples peeled, cored, and sliced
          • 1/4 cup ginger liqueur

          For top:

          • 1 egg slightly beaten with 1 teaspoon water, for egg wash

          Instructions

          • Preheat oven at 350-degrees with a large rimmed cookie sheet in the oven. [THIS IS IMPORTANT. The skillet will likely overflow as it bakes and the hot cookie sheet will also reduce the likelihood of a soggy pie bottom.] Add butter to skillet and place in oven until butter is melted. Remove skillet; stir in brown sugar, then return to oven until sugar starts bubbling, about 10 to 15 more minutes.
          • In the meantime, in a small bowl combine the white sugar, cinnamon, and flour. Set aside.
          • Roll out one of the pie crusts, if not already done. Carefully lay crust inside hot skillet so that bottom and sides are covered. Pour apple slices inside. Drizzle liqueur over the apples, followed by the dry ingredients.
          • Roll out second pie crust. Lay atop the mounded pie. Wary of the hot pan, tuck the crusts together as much as possible. Cut several slits in the top of the pie.
          • Brush egg wash over the top crust. Set pie on top of hot cookie sheet in oven.
          • Bake until pie is golden brown and apples are tender when jabbed with a fork, about 45 to 50 minutes.
          • Let cool at least 30 minutes before cutting. Store covered with foil, at room temperature or in fridge.
          • OM NOM NOM!

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