british

Bready or Not: Cornish Fairings Cookies

Posted by on Aug 2, 2023 in Blog, Bready or Not, british, cookies | 0 comments

Cornish Fairings Cookies (to use the American wording, as these would be Corning Fairings Biscuits at their point of origin in Cornwall) are light, delicious cookies that use golden syrup for flavor and sweetness.

Bready or Not: Cornish Fairings Cookies

Golden Syrup is a delicious ingredient out of the UK. Some recipes call for using a half and half mix of light corn syrup and honey to replace it in American recipes, but I’ve found that’s not a good replacement for the flavor. If you’re in the US, look for Lyle’s Golden Syrup in the British section of a grocery store or at World Market.

Bready or Not: Cornish Fairings Cookies

Ginger gives these cookies a pleasant warming element, but I should note that these aren’t heavy like most gingerbreads. This is something different, light and chewy.

Bready or Not: Cornish Fairings Cookies

Do note that I found these cookies got stiffer in texture after a day, but they were still delicious.

Adapted from Bigger Bolder Baking by Gemma Stafford.

Bready or Not: Cornish Fairings Cookies

This recipe, adapted from Bigger Bolder Baking by Gemma Stafford, uses the British ingredient golden syrup to make a uniquely sweet, lightly spiced cookie.
Course: Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: British
Keyword: cookies, golden syrup
Servings: 33 cookies
Author: Beth Cato

Equipment

  • parchment paper
  • baking sheet
  • food processor
  • teaspoon scoop

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 stick
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar packed
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 6 Tablespoons golden syrup

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400-degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Using a food processor, dice up butter. Add flour, brown sugar, ginger, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt, and pulse to mix, scraping the blades clean as needed. Add golden syrup and pulse to incorporate.
  • Use a teaspoon scoop to dole out dough, spaced out, on parchment paper. Bake for 7 to 9 minutes, until cookies are set and crackled across the top. Cool on sheet for a few minutes, then transfer to a rack to completely cool. Store in an airtight container at room temperature; they will get stiffer in texture after a day, but the flavor is still wonderful.

OM NOM NOM!

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    Bready or Not: Crunchy Biscuits

    Posted by on Jul 12, 2023 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, british, cookies | 0 comments

    These are Crunchy Biscuits in the British sense–that is, they are crunchy cookies with a satisfying snap.

    Bready or Not: Crunchy Biscuits

    I found the recipe in Bigger Bolder Baking by Gemma Stafford [affiliate link], a book gifted to me by my mother-in-law. Gemma is Irish-born and now lives in America, and her fantastic cookbook has ingredients and cooking temperatures in both British and American measurements.

    Bready or Not: Crunchy Biscuits

    This small-batch recipe includes a quintessentially British ingredient, golden syrup, that has no real American parallel. I’ve seen some recommendations to substitute with half measures of light corn syrup and honey, and while that works as a liquid replacement, the flavor isn’t quite the same.

    Bready or Not: Crunchy Biscuits

    That said, golden syrup isn’t hard to find in America, it just tends to be expensive. Even in the wastelands of Phoenix, I could find Lyle’s Golden Syrup in the small British goods section of my local Fry’s (Kroger) chain.

    Bready or Not: Crunchy Biscuits

    These crunchy, hearty cookies are great for a snack or even a breakfast. Oats reign supreme here, but the golden syrup adds a unique, slight flavor that carries through every bite. If you don’t have self-rising flour, substitute with 1 cup of all-purpose flour and two teaspoons of baking powder. Modified from Bigger Bolder Baking by Gemma Stafford.
    Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
    Servings: 30 cookies
    Author: Beth Cato

    Equipment

    • parchment paper
    • baking sheet
    • tablespoon scoop
    • cooling rack

    Ingredients

    • 1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks) softened
    • 3/4 cup white sugar
    • 3 Tablespoons golden syrup
    • 1 cup self-rising flour
    • 2 2/3 cup rolled oats also called old fashioned oats
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1/4 teaspoon salt

    Instructions

    • Preheat oven to 350-degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
    • In a large bowl, cream together butter and sugar until it is soft and light in color. Add golden syrup. Follow up with the flour, oats, baking soda, and salt, mixing until just combined.
    • Use a tablespoon scoop to shape dough, rolling each lump briefly with hands to compress and flatten, then place spaced out two-inches apart on baking sheet. They will spread as they bake.
    • Bake 12 to 14 minutes, until golden brown and set. Let them idle on the cookie sheet about 5 to 10 minutes, then transfer them to a cooling rack. Store them in an airtight container at room temperature.

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      Bready or Not: Golden Syrup Brownies

      Posted by on May 17, 2023 in Blog, Bready or Not, british, brownies, chocolate, fudge | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Golden Syrup Brownies

      I’ve made a lot of brownies that I’ve shared here on Bready or Not, but these Golden Syrup Brownies are the fudgiest I’ve ever made.

      Bready or Not: Golden Syrup Brownies

      Seriously, they are good but they are dense and rich. I highly recommend cutting these things small, just as one does with fudge.

      Bready or Not: Golden Syrup Brownies

      Golden Syrup and coarse sugar are what set these brownies apart. I used Lyle’s Golden Syrup, the original version, imported from the UK. Sometimes you’ll see honey and light corn syrup mentioned as American substitutes; if you want to go that route, split them half and half, but it still won’t be the same as Lyle’s.

      Bready or Not: Golden Syrup Brownies

      As for the coarse sugar, the original recipe printed in Bake from Scratch called for unrefined light muscovado, but I used a mix of demerara and turbinado. Hence my general recommendation for coarse sugar.

      This recipe will keep for weeks in the fridge, have you the fortitude!

      Bready or Not: Golden Syrup Brownies

      These super-fudgy brownies use golden syrup, which is a British ingredient. I recommend Lyle’s Original Golden Syrup, which can be found in the import section of many American grocery stores. Note that these brownies need to chill for hours or overnight before eating. Modified from Bake from Scratch Magazine Sept/Oct 2019.
      Course: Dessert, Snack
      Cuisine: British
      Keyword: bars, brownies, chocolate, fudge
      Author: Beth Cato

      Equipment

      • 9×9 pan
      • aluminum foil
      • nonstick spray
      • fine mesh sieve

      Ingredients

      • 1 1/2 cups plus 2 teaspoons coarse sugar such as turbinado and demerara
      • 14 Tablespoons unsalted butter
      • 4 Tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons golden syrup
      • 1 1/4 cups dark chocolate chopped or in chips
      • 6 large eggs room temperature
      • 2/3 cups plus 2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour

      Instructions

      • Preheat oven at 325-degrees. Line a 9-inch square pan with foil and apply nonstick spray.
      • In a large saucepan, heat the coarse sugar, butter, and golden syrup over medium heat until the mixture is smooth and bubbly, around 5 to 6 minutes. Remove the pan from heat and add the chocolate. Stir until everything is melted. Let cool for a bit.
      • In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs. Strain them through a fine mesh sieve into the batter. Stir everything to incorporate. Add flour, stirring until no white streaks remain. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Tap it on the counter a few times to knock bubbles free and level the batter.
      • Bake until brownies are set with the center still moist, about 45 minutes. It’s okay if they look slightly underdone. Let pan cool to room temperature. Refrigerate at least 6 hours or overnight.
      • Use foil to lift contents onto a cutting board. Use a large knife to cut brownies into small squares. If the brownies stick to the knife, wipe it clean after each pass and dip the blade in hot water before each cut. Store brownies in a sealed container in the fridge for up to two weeks, or freeze for longer.

      OM NOM NOM!

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        Bready or Not Original: Cookie Butter Shortbread

        Posted by on Jul 20, 2022 in biscoff spread, Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, british, chocolate, cookies | Comments Off on Bready or Not Original: Cookie Butter Shortbread

        The Cookie Butter Shortbread is a new riff on my classic Shortbread recipe that I’ve also made with espresso powder and chocolate chips–and also with an infusion of lemon and a glaze. It’s a versatile base recipe.

        Bready or Not Original: Cookie Butter Shortbread

        Now, I bet some of you are asking–what is cookie butter? It’s essentially pureed spice cookies with oil, forming a spreadable consistency just like peanut butter. You can find it in stores by the nut butter; Trader Joe’s carries it under the name Speculoos. What cookie butter does is make cookies taste moreā€¦ cookie. You’ll know what I mean when you try it.

        Bready or Not Original: Cookie Butter Shortbread

        This is not a crisp shortbread like the traditional Walker’s brand (which is delicious in its own right). No, this shortbread is cakey and soft, only crisp at the very edge.

        Bready or Not Original: Cookie Butter Shortbread

        Sometimes the first piece out of the pan can even be fussy and break in half; a metal pie spatula helps, but sometimes it can still happen. That’s no major problem, though, because of every bite of Shortbread is good, even if it’s not perfectly photogenic.

        Bready or Not Original: Cookie Butter Shortbread

        Enjoy this Cookie Butter Shortbread for breakfast or snacks, or in proper fashion at tea time.

        Bready or Not Original: Cookie Butter Shortbread

        This new twist on my classic Shortbread mixes cookie butter and chocolate chips into the dough! These are cookies with an extra oomph of cookie flavor.
        Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
        Cuisine: British, Scottish
        Keyword: chocolate, cookie butter, cookies, shortbread
        Author: Beth Cato

        Equipment

        • 2 pie plates

        Ingredients

        • 2 cups all-purpose flour
        • 3/4 cup white sugar
        • 1/4 teaspoon salt
        • 1 cup unsalted butter 2 sticks, softened
        • 1 egg yolk
        • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
        • 1/4 cup creamy cookie butter
        • 1/2 cup milk chocolate chips

        Instructions

        • Preheat oven at 375-degrees. Apply nonstick spray to both pie plates.
        • Stir together the flour, sugar, and salt. Add butter, egg yolk, vanilla extract, and cookie butter. Use hands to compress dough together. Add the chocolate chips and mix, bringing dough together again to form a ball. Divide in half, placing one in each pie plate. Flatten dough with palms to create an even surface. Prick surface all over with a fork then use a knife to slash dough into triangular wedges.
        • Bake for 18 to 22 minutes, until edges are golden brown and middle is set. Remove from oven and cut again along slash marks. Let shortbread cool completely, then cut again along existing marks.
        • Shortbread keeps for several days at room temperature. It can be stored covered in pie plates, or stacked in a sealed container with wax paper between the layers.

        OM NOM NOM!

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          Bready or Not Original: Lemon Shortbread

          Posted by on May 25, 2022 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, british, cookies, lemon | Comments Off on Bready or Not Original: Lemon Shortbread

          My Shortbread recipe was the first I really mastered as a teenager beginning to bake. This new version uses that as a base, but modifies it into a delicious Lemon Shortbread.

          Bready or Not Original: Lemon Shortbread

          I love a good Scottish Shortbread. It’s so buttery and scrumptious. The fresh zing of lemon plays very well with that inherent butter flavor and texture.

          Bready or Not Original: Lemon Shortbread

          This is not a crisp shortbread like the traditional Walker’s brand (which is delicious in its own right). No, this shortbread is cakey and soft, only crisp at the very edge.

          Bready or Not Original: Lemon Shortbread

          Sometimes the first piece out of the pan can even be fussy and break in half; a metal pie spatula helps, but sometimes it can still happen. That’s no major problem, though, because of every bite of Shortbread is good, even if it’s not perfectly photogenic.

          Bready or Not Original: Lemon Shortbread

          This new version does have a photogenic advantage, though, because the glaze is so very pretty. It should be just thick enough to drizzle, though if it’s a touch watery, that’s not the end of the world.

          Enjoy this Lemon Shortbread for breakfast or snacks, or in proper fashion at tea time.

          Bready or Not Original: Lemon Shortbread

          This new twist on my classic Shortbread mixes lemon zest into the dough and utilizes a splash of lemon glaze on top. It’s a refreshing, delicious snack or breakfast treat!
          Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
          Cuisine: Scottish
          Keyword: citrus, cookies, lemon, shortbread
          Servings: 12 pieces
          Author: Beth Cato

          Equipment

          • 2 pie plates

          Ingredients

          Shortbread

          • 1 lemon zested and juiced
          • 2 cups all-purpose flour
          • 3/4 cup white sugar
          • 1/4 teaspoon salt
          • 1 cup unsalted butter (2 sticks) softened
          • 1 egg yolk
          • 1 teaspoon lemon flavor
          • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

          Lemon Glaze

          • 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
          • 1 Tablespoon lemon juice

          Instructions

          • Preheat oven at 375-degrees. Apply nonstick spray to both pie plates.
          • Stir together the lemon zest, flour, sugar, and salt. Add butter, egg yolk, lemon flavor, and vanilla extract. Use hands to compress dough together to make a ball. Divide in half, placing one in each pie plate. Flatten dough with palms to create an even surface. Prick surface all over with a fork then use a knife to slash dough into triangular wedges.
          • Bake for 18 to 22 minutes, until edges are golden brown and middle is set. Remove from oven and cut again along slash marks. Let shortbread cool completely.
          • In a medium bowl, stir together confectioners’ sugar and lemon juice to create a glaze with a consistency to drip and keep shape. Drizzle all over shortbread. Let set, then cut again along existing marks.
          • Shortbread keeps for several days at room temperature. It can be stored covered in pie plates, or stacked in a sealed container with wax paper between the layers.

          OM NOM NOM!

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            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            Posted by on Jan 26, 2022 in Blog, Bready or Not, british, bundt, yeast bread | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            When I had the opportunity to visit the city of Bath in England in 2019, I knew the absolutely necessary stop for lunch was Sally Lunn Eating House, known for centuries for the Sally Lunn bun. I first learned of it from a history spot on the Great British Bake Off.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            The bun has some mystery and history to it, but what is certain is that it is rather brioche-like and delicious. Upon coming home, I set about trying several recipes for a homemade version. The results were meh–until this one, which is odd because this bread is also very different.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            The true Sally Lunn bun is a bun, made in a specialized bun mold. This recipe makes an enriched bread, mixed in a food processor, and risen and baked in a bundt pan. The result is a lush, sweet bread. The flavor and feel is right, even if the shape is radically different.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            Though it has a browned crust, the bread itself is still somewhat delicate. It requires thick slices, which isn’t a bad thing at all, because it’s so soft and delicious.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            I don’t often share process photos on Bready or Not, but I think for this recipe, they will help. First of all, here’s what the bread looked like with the batter just placed in the bundt pan.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            Here it is after the second rise!

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            We found that the bread needed to be eaten hot, with toasted being the best. Since the pan made a big loaf–18 thick slices–I had plenty of bread to experiment with. I hit on the idea of using it for grilled cheese sandwiches using the waffle iron. This is THE BEST way to make grilled cheese, by the way.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            This shot shows how thick the bread was. I was still able to compress it in the waffle iron just fine, where in a matter of minutes, I created a no-fuss crispy, buttery masterpiece.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            This is an enriched yeast bread, inspired by the famous bread made in Bath, England. This version is mixed in a food processor, then rises and bakes in a bundt cake. The result is great to eat in combinations that are savory or sweet–it tastes best toasted in some way, whether with butter and jam or even as a lush grilled cheese sandwich, pressed flat in a waffle maker! The bread results in about 18 thick, angled slices.
            Course: Appetizer, Bread, Dessert, Main Course
            Cuisine: British
            Keyword: yeast bread
            Author: Beth Cato

            Equipment

            • large food processor
            • large bundt pan

            Ingredients

            • 1/2 cup milk
            • 1/2 cup water
            • 3 1/2 to 4 cups all-purpose flour
            • 1/3 cup white sugar
            • 1 teaspoon salt
            • 2 1/4 teaspoon instant yeast
            • 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 stick, room temperature
            • 3 large eggs room temperature

            Instructions

            • Warm the milk and water together, by microwave or stovetop, to about 100-degrees.
            • Fit a plastic dough blade inside the food processor. Add 2 cups flour, the sugar, salt, and yeast. Pulse a few times. Add the milk-water, butter, and eggs, and pulse more. Add 1/2 cup more flour. Pulse again. Add the rest of the flour, pulsing until the dough becomes stiff.
            • Cover mixer bowl with lid or plastic wrap and let dough rise at room temperature for about an hour. It should double.
            • Remove plastic wrap, if using, and affix lid. Pulse a few times to beat down again–but be warned, the dough is so thick, the processor might jump around. Stay right there. The dough only needs a few seconds of pulses.
            • Thoroughly grease the bundt pan. Pour in the batter and smooth it out to an even level. Cover pan with plastic wrap or a towel and let the dough rise until it has doubled again, about 50 minutes.
            • Preheat oven at 325-degrees.
            • Bake for 50 minutes. The loaf should look golden brown on top, and a digital thermometer plunged into the middle of the bread should read at least 190-degrees.
            • Let loaf cool in pan about 20 minutes, then invert onto a rack to cool more. The bread is fragile to cut and requires thick slices. This Sally Lunn loaf is best eaten warm, especially toasted. It can also be cut into individual slices and frozen for later enjoyment.

            OM NOM NOM!

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