yeast bread

Bready or Not: Soft Breadsticks from the Bread Machine

Posted by on May 11, 2022 in Blog, Bready or Not, cheese galore, yeast bread | 0 comments

Soft Breadsticks are so very cozy and comforting. They are even better when they are easy to make from-scratch at home, thanks to a bread machine.

Bready or Not: Soft Breadsticks from the Bread Machine

These are truly classic breadsticks. Doughy. Buttery. Just a touch of cheese on top.

Bready or Not: Soft Breadsticks from the Bread Machine

Season these however you want. Italian seasoning is great; I have Penzey’s pizza seasoning around, and I found it delicious in this recipe.

Bready or Not: Soft Breadsticks from the Bread Machine

Sometimes I try to be precise with bread recipes when it comes to the baking stage–I pull out my food scale and weigh each round to get equal rolls. Not so here. I just wanted things that were, generally, in stick form.

Bready or Not: Soft Breadsticks from the Bread Machine

If you have any leftovers, the sticks do keep well for two days at room temp, or you can freeze them for later. Just wrap them in foil to reheat in an oven or toaster oven.

Modified from the fantastic cookbook Making Artisan Breads in the Bread Machine by Michelle Anderson, available at Amazon, Bookshop, and other stores. [affiliate links]

Bready or Not: Soft Breadsticks from the Bread Machine

If you love pillowy, soft breadsticks, this is the recipe for you! They mix up easily in the bread machine.
Course: Appetizer, Bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: Italian
Keyword: cheese, yeast bread
Author: Beth Cato

Equipment

  • large baking sheet
  • parchment paper
  • pastry brush

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups lukewarm water (100-110 F degrees)
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon dry Italian seasoning or pizza seasoning
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 3 3/4 cups bread flour plus more for the work surface
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons instant dry yeast
  • 2 Tablespoons melted butter
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese or Grana Padano

Instructions

  • Follow ingredient order for your bread machine; for most, that means liquids first. Place water, oil, sugar, seasoning, and salt in the bread machine bucket. Add the flour and the yeast. Start the machine on DOUGH cycle.
  • Check on the dough as it mixes, if possible, and add a touch more liquid or flour as necessary. Dough should be soft and plush.
  • Prepare a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Once the dough cycle is done, transfer the dough to a clean, floured work surface. If equal breadsticks are desired, use a food scale to weigh the dough and divide–or simply pat out the dough and use a pizza cutter or bench knife to slice the bread into stick form. Transfer them to the baking sheet. Cover them with plastic wrap or a towel and let them rise for another 45 minutes to an hour, until nicely puffed.
  • Preheat oven at 350-degrees.
  • Bake time will vary dependent on their size. If about 12 breadsticks are on the sheet, bake for about 12 minutes. Pull out of oven briefly to brush on melted butter. Sprinkle cheese all over top. Place breadsticks back in oven to bake for another 3 to 5 minutes, until sticks are more golden and cheese is melted.
  • Eat breadsticks warm. Store any leftovers in a sealed plastic bag at room temperature for up to 2 days. They can also be frozen for later enjoyment.

OM NOM NOM!

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    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    Posted by on May 4, 2022 in biscoff spread, Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, bundt, cake, chocolate, yeast bread | 0 comments

    This Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche is stunning in appearance and taste, so be warned: there are more pictures than usual for this post, including some process photos.

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    When I set out to rewrite the original recipe, featured in the January/February 2019 issue of Bake from Scratch, I knew this bread would be time-consuming. Intimidating, even.

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    The braiding process, shown here, had me worried to start, but that turned out to not be so bad after all.

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    What ended up being the most tedious aspect was all the necessary dishwashing between the various stages! This recipe would be a great time to have some helpful assistants around.

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    The original recipe used special black cocoa paired with peanut butter. I went with normal baking cocoa (Penzey’s), which is less dramatic in color but great with flavor, and my stalwart baking favorite, cookie butter.

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    Despite my evangelizing, some people are always meeting cookie butter for the first time. It’s found in jars near the nut butters in stores. Trader Joe’s carries it under the name Speculoos. The other major brand is Biscoff. It tastes like spice cookies pureed in oil, because that’s exactly what it is.

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    It’s also incredible to bake with because it can even make cookies taste inherently more cookie-like. Here, when it’s used with chocolate, cocoa, and fresh bread, it’s truly amazing.

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    During baking, I found the exposed swirls of cookie butter actually caramelized, creating a wonderful crunch in the same bite as tender enriched bread. That, along with chocolate?

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    Oh wow. Oh wow.

    Bready or Not: Braided Cocoa and Cookie Butter Brioche

    This braided loaf, baked in a large tube pan, is an absolute show stopper with its swirled layers of cocoa and creamy cookie butter! It’s as delicious as it looks, too. This recipe is fairly straightforward, but be warned, it requires a lot of dishwashing!
    Course: Bread, Breakfast, Dessert
    Cuisine: American
    Keyword: bundt cake, chocolate, cookie butter, yeast bread
    Author: Beth Cato

    Equipment

    • stand mixer
    • food scale
    • Rolling Pin
    • uneven spatula
    • bench knife
    • pastry brush

    Ingredients

    • 1 cup warm milk (105-110-degrees F)
    • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
    • 2 large eggs room temperature
    • 1/2 cup unsalted butter (1 stick) melted
    • 4 teaspoons vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste, divided
    • 4 1/2 cup all-purpose flour plus more if needed
    • 1/4 cup white sugar
    • 1 Tablespoon kosher salt
    • 3/4 cup plus 2/3 cup confectioners' sugar divided
    • 2/3 cup creamy cookie butter
    • 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter melted
    • 1/2 cup unsalted butter softened
    • 1/2 cup semisweet chocolate melted
    • 1/3 cup cocoa powder sifted
    • 1 large egg white
    • 1 Tablespoon water

    Instructions

    • In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, stir together warm milk and yeast, letting it stand about 5 minutes to get foamy.
    • Mix in the eggs, 1 stick melted butter, and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Follow up with the flour, sugar, and salt, beating until combined. Switch to the dough hook and beat for about 4 minutes, until smooth.
    • Use nonstick spray on a large bowl. Lightly flour a flat surface and turn out the dough to form it into a round. Place it in a bowl, rotating it to grease the entire surface. Cover and let rise for about 1 hour, until it doubles in size.
    • Clean everything and return to the stand mixer. Using the paddle attachment, beat the 2/3 cup confectioners’ sugar with the cookie butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla, and 3 Tablespoons melted butter, until smooth. Transfer the mixture to another bowl. set aside.
    • Clean the mixer and paddle attachment again. Beat the final stick of softened butter, the melted chocolate, cocoa, remaining 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, and last 1 teaspoon vanilla, until smooth. Set aside.
    • Lightly flour a flat surface again. Punch down the dough and turn it onto the surface. Use a food scale to divide the dough in half. Stash one half back in the bowl for now, covered to prevent drying. Roll the other half into a 20 by 9 rectangle. Use an uneven spatula to spread the cookie butter filling onto the dough, up to 1/2-inch of the edges all the way around. Starting on a long side, tightly roll up the dough, pinching the seam to seal. Set aside with the seam faced down.
    • Roll out the other dough in the same way, this time spreading on the chocolate-cocoa filling. Roll it up as well, placing the two dough rolls side by side. Use a bench knife to cut each roll in half, lengthwise. With the multi-layered middles facing up, twine the strips together.
    • Apply nonstick spray on tube pan. Lift braid into the pan and tug it to form a complete circle, tucking the ends beneath. Cover the bread and let it rise in a warm spot until it’s puffed, about 30 minutes.
    • Preheat oven 350-degrees.
    • In a small bowl, whisk together the egg white and water. Brush the top of the dough, touching the cookie butter strands first, then the chocolate; this will prevent the chocolate from smearing too much.
    • Bake for about 50 to 55 minutes, covering the bread with foil halfway through to prevent too much browning. When done, the top should be golden and an instant-read thermometer should be above 190-degrees.
    • Let cool in pan for about 15 minutes. Turn out onto a plate, then tip it back onto a rack to completely cool, top-up.
    • The bread is best eaten within a day, but it can also be sliced up and frozen in pieces. It'll thaw later and taste beautifully fresh! Eat at room temperature or slightly warmed.

    OM NOM NOM!

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      Bready or Not Original: Bread Machine Beer Bread Rolls

      Posted by on Apr 13, 2022 in alcohol, Blog, Bready or Not, yeast bread | 0 comments

      Your home bread machine makes delicious carbs super-easy with these Bread Machine Beer Bread Rolls!

      Bready or Not: Bread Machine Beer Bread Rolls

      First things first: the type of beer. You could try this with any number of beers, but I suggest a darker one. I’ve tried this with Kiltlifter (a major local beer in Arizona) and also Guinness. Guinness definitely created rolls that were darker with a deeper flavor. I have not tried this with a nonalcoholic beer.

      Bready or Not: Bread Machine Beer Bread Rolls

      Really, choose a beer that will go well with the meal. Don’t worry about alcohol amounts in the final product, either. It’ll burn off in the baking process. Also, you don’t have to like beer to like these rolls. I do not like beer (seriously, I really do not like beer) but I do enjoy the hoppy flavor it imbues in this bread!

      Bready or Not: Bread Machine Beer Bread Rolls

      A food scale will be an immense help in creating like-sized rolls. I’ve used this recipe to make medium-sized rolls, good for a butter-lacquered side dish, as well as big rolls suitable for BBQ-sauce shredded pork or other heaped-on fixings.

      Bready or Not: Bread Machine Beer Bread Rolls

      The rolls are fantastic fresh and will keep fine for a few days, and they are great to freeze. If you freeze them soon after they come out from the oven, they will taste just that fresh when you later thaw them!

      Bready or Not: Bread Machine Beer Bread Rolls

      Bready or Not Original: Bread Machine Beer Bread Rolls

      Beer works along with dry yeast to add loft, texture, and depth of flavor in these soft, delicious rolls. Divide the recipe however you wish–you can divide by 11 to get medium-sized rolls for a supper side dish, or by 6 to get rolls big enough for hearty sandwiches.
      Course: Bread
      Keyword: alcohol, bread machine, yeast bread
      Author: Beth Cato

      Equipment

      • bread machine
      • food thermometer
      • food scale

      Ingredients

      • 12 ounces dark beer such as Kiltlifter or Guinness
      • 1/2 cup water
      • 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
      • 4 to 4 1/2 cups bread flour plus more for dusting
      • 1 1/2 teaspoons instant dry yeast

      Instructions

      • This may be a travesty for some, but place the beer and water in a large microwave-safe dish. Give the liquid a brief zap in the microwave to raise the temperature to 100 to 110-degrees. Place in the pan of the bread machine. Add the salt, 4 cups bread flour, and yeast. Start the machine on the dough setting.
      • Check on the dough as it begins mixing. If your bread machine allows, as the cycle is on-going, add more flour if the dough looks too loose, or add a touch more water if it is too dense and lumpy.
      • When the cycle is done, weight the dough and do the math to divide into rolls of desired size. Prepare a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Divide the dough with the help of the food scale, shaping and smoothing each piece into a roll. Set spaced out on sheet.
      • Cover dough balls with plastic wrap or towels and set in a place to rise, 30 minutes to an hour.
      • Preheat oven at 350-degrees. Remove cover from dough and baking sheet. For medium rolls, bake for around 24 minutes; for larger rolls, bake for about 28 minutes. Check for doneness by tapping rolls and listening for a hollow sound, or plunge the food thermometer into a discreet place to verify the temperature in the middle if above 190-degrees.
      • Cool at least 20 minutes before eating. Rolls will keep in a sealed bag at room temperature for up to 2 days, and can also be frozen to enjoy much later.

      OM NOM NOM!

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        Bready or Not: Crescent Rolls

        Posted by on Mar 16, 2022 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, yeast bread | 0 comments

        Crescent Rolls are a classic yeast bread side. This recipe guides you through the steps to make these tear-apart hot bready bits of heaven.

        Bready or Not: Crescent Rolls

        As I grew up, the only fresh crescent rolls I got to have came out of a can, and they were a real treat. Those still have a major advantage in convenience.

        Bready or Not: Crescent Rolls

        Here’s the thing, though–from-scratch rolls do take a while to make, but this recipe makes a big batch (24) and they are fantastic to freeze. That means if you dedicate a day to bread-making, you can portion out your rolls and freeze a bunch to last for weeks.

        Bready or Not: Crescent Rolls

        That also involves some measure of self-control, because these Crescent Rolls are AMAZING.

        Bready or Not: Crescent Rolls

        These things are enriched, meaning they include both milk and butter. That gives them a soft, tender texture inside. They are also brushed with butter before and after baking, because butter makes everything better.

        Bready or Not: Crescent Rolls

        There’s nothing quite like unspooling a hot, steamy Crescent Roll, the dough flaking apart between your fingertips.

        Recipe modified from Bake from Scratch November-December 2018.

        Bready or Not: Crescent Rolls

        Homemade crescent rolls take some time but are straightforward to make using this recipe! The result is delicious rolls that keep well at room temperature for several days and can be frozen for later, too! Makes 24 rolls.
        Course: Bread, Breakfast
        Keyword: yeast bread
        Servings: 24 rolls
        Author: Beth Cato

        Equipment

        • kitchen scale
        • two large baking sheets
        • parchment paper
        • pizza cutter
        • pastry brush

        Ingredients

        • 4 1/4 cups bread flour
        • 1 Tablespoon plus 1 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
        • 1 Tablespoon kosher salt
        • 1 cup milk
        • 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 stick
        • 2 Tablespoons white sugar
        • 2 Tablespoons honey
        • 1 large egg room temperature
        • 1 large egg yolk room temperature
        • 1/4 cup unsalted butter half stick, melted

        Instructions

        • Using a stand mixer with a dough hook attached, combine the flour, yeast, and salt.
        • Use a microwave or stove top to warm the milk, butter, sugar and honey to about 120-degrees (if it gets above that, give it a few minutes to drop down). Add the warm milk mixture to the flour until just combined, scraping the bowl as needed. Follow up with the egg and egg yolk, and continue to beat for about 6 more minutes. The dough should be smooth and elastic.
        • Add nonstick spray to a large bowl. Drop in the dough, flipping it to grease the surface all over. Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and let rise in a warm spot until it is doubled, about 45 minutes.
        • Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
        • Punch down the dough in the bowl. Lightly flour a work surface. Use a food scale to weigh the dough; divide it in half. Keep one of the halves covered while the other is rolled out to a foot-wide circle. Use a pizza cutter or knife to slice it into twelve triangles, like a pizza.
        • To form a crescent roll, start at the wide end of a dough piece and roll it up, tucking and pressing the pointed tip underneath. Set spaced-out on a prepared pan. Repeat to form more rolls. Cover with a towel or plastic wrap to rise another 45 minutes to an hour.
        • Near the end of the rise, preheat the oven at 375-degrees. Melt the half stick of butter and brush about half over the rolls.
        • Place both sheets on racks inside oven and bake for 7 minutes. Switch placement of baking sheets on the racks. Bake for another 5 to 8 minutes, until they are a nice golden brown. Brush on the rest of the butter.
        • Eat immediately, while warmed, or at room temperature. Crescent rolls will keep in a sealed bag for at least 2 days, and can also be frozen for later enjoyment.

        OM NOM NOM!

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          Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          Posted by on Feb 9, 2022 in Blog, Bready or Not, cheese galore, side dish, yeast bread | Comments Off on Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          Bread is awesome. Cheese is awesome. Combine them to achieve a special kind of awesome, especially in the case of these Comte Pull-Apart Rolls.

          Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          These rolls are tender, soft, and inherently savory. They are perfect to go along with roasts.

          Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          First of all, the cheese. If you live in a cheese-deprived area as I do, Comte may not be available (or is only available at Christmas, sigh) or is prohibitively expensive. Really, you can use any cheese you like here, but I advise using one with a savory note. Another alpine cheese or a bandage-wrapped cheddar would do the trick.

          Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          My recipe is based on one featured in the Nov/Dec 2018 issue of Bake from Scratch. I made significant modifications, the foremost being that I halved the recipe so that it would only produce 12 rolls.

          Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          This recipe isn’t as fussy as some homemade rolls, but it still takes some time and effort. I was very worried because my first rise was so low, but my rolls rose beautifully once they were formed. That’s the rise that really matters!

          Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          If you want to give your second rise a boost, use this trick: preheat your oven at 200-degrees. Shape your rolls or bread. Stick the dough in the oven without any plastic wrap or cover. Immediately turn the oven OFF. Set a timer for 30 to 40 minutes or longer; this will depend on the oven, so experiment. Once the bread has nicely puffed from the heat, remove it from the oven, then preheat it again for the full bake.

          Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          These rolls can be eaten at room temperature or warm, but for me, they really are far better hot. I want them to melt butter!

          Bready or Not Original: Comte Pull-Apart Rolls

          This recipe makes 12 hearty, soft rolls that are perfect to go along with a special meal! If you can’t find Comte, substitute with another alpine cheese or bandage-wrapped cheddar to achieve that same kind of savory depth.
          Course: Bread, Side Dish
          Keyword: cheese, yeast bread
          Servings: 12 rolls
          Author: Beth Cato

          Equipment

          • 9×9 pan
          • parchment paper
          • kitchen scale
          • pastry brush

          Ingredients

          • 1/2 cup warm milk (105-110 degrees F), can substitute half & half
          • 1/2 cup warm water (105-110 degrees F)
          • 1/2 Tablespoon active dry yeast
          • 1 large egg room temperature
          • 2 Tablespoons white sugar
          • 1/4 cup unsalted butter melted and divided
          • 1/2 Tablespoon kosher salt
          • 2 3/4 cup bread flour
          • 2 Tablespoons dried parsley or other dried herbs
          • 4 ounces grated Comte cheese 100 grams
          • flaked salt for garnish, optional

          Instructions

          • In a stand mixer, place the warm liquids and yeast. Let stand for about 10 minutes, until the yeast is nice and foamy. Add the eggs, sugar, 2 Tablespoons of melted butter, and salt. Gradually beat in the flour, cheese, and parsley, until everything is well combined.
          • Cover the bowl to let the dough rise for about an hour.
          • Line a 9×9 pan with parchment paper cut to crisscross and extend up all four sides. Apply nonstick spray.
          • Lightly flour a surface. Turn out the dough onto it. Use the kitchen scale to weigh the dough. Divide it into 12 equal portions, forming each into a tidy ball. Place in rows within the prepared pan, each roll touching. Cover the pan to let rolls rise for another 40 minutes to an hour.
          • Preheat oven at 375-degrees. Brush rolls with remaining 2 Tablespoons butter and add a sprinkle of flaked salt, if desired.
          • Bake rolls for 13 minutes. Check them. If they are getting quite brown, cover the pan with foil. Bake for another 13 to 15 minutes.
          • Serve rolls at room temperature or warm.

          OM NOM NOM!

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            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            Posted by on Jan 26, 2022 in Blog, Bready or Not, british, bundt, yeast bread | Comments Off on Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            When I had the opportunity to visit the city of Bath in England in 2019, I knew the absolutely necessary stop for lunch was Sally Lunn Eating House, known for centuries for the Sally Lunn bun. I first learned of it from a history spot on the Great British Bake Off.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            The bun has some mystery and history to it, but what is certain is that it is rather brioche-like and delicious. Upon coming home, I set about trying several recipes for a homemade version. The results were meh–until this one, which is odd because this bread is also very different.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            The true Sally Lunn bun is a bun, made in a specialized bun mold. This recipe makes an enriched bread, mixed in a food processor, and risen and baked in a bundt pan. The result is a lush, sweet bread. The flavor and feel is right, even if the shape is radically different.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            Though it has a browned crust, the bread itself is still somewhat delicate. It requires thick slices, which isn’t a bad thing at all, because it’s so soft and delicious.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            I don’t often share process photos on Bready or Not, but I think for this recipe, they will help. First of all, here’s what the bread looked like with the batter just placed in the bundt pan.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            Here it is after the second rise!

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            We found that the bread needed to be eaten hot, with toasted being the best. Since the pan made a big loaf–18 thick slices–I had plenty of bread to experiment with. I hit on the idea of using it for grilled cheese sandwiches using the waffle iron. This is THE BEST way to make grilled cheese, by the way.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            This shot shows how thick the bread was. I was still able to compress it in the waffle iron just fine, where in a matter of minutes, I created a no-fuss crispy, buttery masterpiece.

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            Bready or Not: Sally Lunn Bread in a Bundt Cake Pan

            This is an enriched yeast bread, inspired by the famous bread made in Bath, England. This version is mixed in a food processor, then rises and bakes in a bundt cake. The result is great to eat in combinations that are savory or sweet–it tastes best toasted in some way, whether with butter and jam or even as a lush grilled cheese sandwich, pressed flat in a waffle maker! The bread results in about 18 thick, angled slices.
            Course: Appetizer, Bread, Dessert, Main Course
            Cuisine: British
            Keyword: yeast bread
            Author: Beth Cato

            Equipment

            • large food processor
            • large bundt pan

            Ingredients

            • 1/2 cup milk
            • 1/2 cup water
            • 3 1/2 to 4 cups all-purpose flour
            • 1/3 cup white sugar
            • 1 teaspoon salt
            • 2 1/4 teaspoon instant yeast
            • 1/2 cup unsalted butter 1 stick, room temperature
            • 3 large eggs room temperature

            Instructions

            • Warm the milk and water together, by microwave or stovetop, to about 100-degrees.
            • Fit a plastic dough blade inside the food processor. Add 2 cups flour, the sugar, salt, and yeast. Pulse a few times. Add the milk-water, butter, and eggs, and pulse more. Add 1/2 cup more flour. Pulse again. Add the rest of the flour, pulsing until the dough becomes stiff.
            • Cover mixer bowl with lid or plastic wrap and let dough rise at room temperature for about an hour. It should double.
            • Remove plastic wrap, if using, and affix lid. Pulse a few times to beat down again–but be warned, the dough is so thick, the processor might jump around. Stay right there. The dough only needs a few seconds of pulses.
            • Thoroughly grease the bundt pan. Pour in the batter and smooth it out to an even level. Cover pan with plastic wrap or a towel and let the dough rise until it has doubled again, about 50 minutes.
            • Preheat oven at 325-degrees.
            • Bake for 50 minutes. The loaf should look golden brown on top, and a digital thermometer plunged into the middle of the bread should read at least 190-degrees.
            • Let loaf cool in pan about 20 minutes, then invert onto a rack to cool more. The bread is fragile to cut and requires thick slices. This Sally Lunn loaf is best eaten warm, especially toasted. It can also be cut into individual slices and frozen for later enjoyment.

            OM NOM NOM!

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