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Bready or Not Original: Browned Butter Coffee Bundt Cake

Posted by on Jan 13, 2021 in Blog, Bready or Not, breakfast, bundt, cake, nutty | 0 comments

This Browed Butter Coffee Bundt Cake is moist, delicious, and packed with a flavors that will get your day off to a good start.

Bready or Not Original: Brown Butter Coffee Bundt Cake

And by a good start, of course, that includes CAFFEINE. Espresso powder is included in the icing!

Bready or Not Original: Brown Butter Coffee Bundt Cake

What I love about this cake is that it has all the luscious flavors of a coffee cake without the crumbly mess of the topping. In this cake, that crunchy, extra-sugary layer is in the center!

Bready or Not Original: Brown Butter Coffee Bundt Cake

This is a great cake for a breakfast or brunch, and it’s a fantastic one to cut into individual slices, wrap up, and freeze for later.

Bready or Not Original: Brown Butter Coffee Bundt Cake

If 2021 is anything like 2020, it’s a very good idea to have a stash of quick-thaw cake in the freezer.

Bready or Not Original: Brown Butter Coffee Bundt Cake

Modified from Fall Baking Magazine 2013.

Bready or Not Original: Browned Butter Coffee Bundt Cake

This cake has all the delicious flavors and textures of a coffee cake, but without the crumbling, messy topping!
Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: American
Keyword: bundt cake, cake, coffee, pecans
Author: Beth Cato

Equipment

  • large bundt cake pan

Ingredients

Bundt cake

  • 3/4 cup unsalted butter 1 1/2 sticks
  • nonstick spray with flour
  • 2 cups pecan pieces finely chopped, divided
  • 2 cups brown sugar packed, divided
  • 2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups vanilla yogurt or plain yogurt, crème fraiche, or sour cream

Coffee icing

  • 4 teaspoons milk or half & half, or more as needed
  • 1/2 teaspoon espresso powder
  • 2 cups confectioners’ sugar or more as needed

Instructions

  • First of all, brown the butter. (Note that this can be done a day ahead of time with the butter stashed in the fridge; set at room temperature to soften again or briefly and carefully, zap in microwave before mixing into recipe.) In a medium saucepan, melt the butter on medium-low heat for 5 to 6 minutes, until it becomes brown and embodied by a nutty fragrance. Remove from heat and cool for a while, then transfer to a small bowl. Cover and chill in the fridge for 2 hours, at minimum, to make firm.
  • Preheat oven at 325-degrees. Apply nonstick spray with flour to coat inside of a large bundt pan. Soften the browned butter a bit.
  • Prepare the filling. In a small bowl, mix together 3/4 cups of chopped pecans, 1/2 cup brown sugar, and 2 teaspoons of flour. Add 3 Tablespoons of the browned butter and work it in with a fork until it makes a crumbly mix.
  • In another bowl, mix together the 3 cups flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.
  • In a big mixing bowl, beat together the remaining browned butter with the rest of the brown sugar. Add the eggs, one at a time, followed by the vanilla. Take turns mixing in the dry ingredients and the yogurt until just combined. Fold in the remaining 1 1/4 cups pecans.
  • Pour about half the batter into the prepared pan and even it out. Sprinkle filling over it all the way around. Pour in the rest of the batter and spread it even again.
  • Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until it passes the toothpick test in the middle. Let cool for about 20 minutes, then invert it onto a rack to completely cool.
  • Make the coffee icing. Stir together the milk, espresso powder, and confectioners’ sugar, adding more milk or sugar as needed to make an icing of a good consistency. Drizzle over cake.
  • Store at room temperature. Can be sliced and frozen for later enjoyment.

OM NOM NOM!

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    Bready or Not: Double Pecan Thumbprint Cookies

    Posted by on Jan 6, 2021 in Blog, Bready or Not, cookies, nutty | 0 comments

    These Double Pecan Thumbprint Cookies take some extra work, but that is evident in their final appearance and flavor.

    Bready or Not: Double Pecan Thumbprint Cookies

    Seriously, these cookies are amazing. The shortbread-like base is filled with frangipane and crowned with a pecan. You get layers of flavor and texture in a single bite.

    Bready or Not: Double Pecan Thumbprint Cookies

    “What is frangipane?” you may ask. It’s an almond custard found in various fine European baked goods. You’ll find it in past Bready or Not recipes like last week’s Galettes Des Rois.

    Bready or Not: Double Pecan Thumbprint Cookies

    I wouldn’t rate this recipe as difficult, just outright laborious.

    Bready or Not: Double Pecan Thumbprint Cookies

    Plan to make these cookies over a day or a few days, and then try to space out the eating of the cookies like that, too. They are sooo dangerously good.

    Bready or Not: Double Pecan Thumbprint Cookies

    Modified from the original found in Bon Appetit December 2018/January 2019.

    Bready or Not: Double Pecan Thumbprint Cookies

    There’s no denying these cookies take extra work, but they look like it and taste like it! A shortbread-like base is topped with luscious from-scratch frangipane with a whole pecan crown. These cookies are delicious decadence.
    Course: Dessert, Snack
    Cuisine: American
    Keyword: cookies, pecans
    Author: Beth Cato

    Equipment

    • food processor
    • stand mixer

    Ingredients

    Frangipane

    • 2 cups pecan halves
    • 1/3 cup white sugar
    • 1 large egg white
    • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter room temperature
    • 1 teaspoon espresso powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract

    Dough and Assembly

    • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    • 3/4 cup unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks) room temperature
    • 1/4 cup white sugar
    • 3/4 cup confectioners' sugar divided; plus more for serving, if desired
    • 1 large egg yolk
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract or vanilla paste

    Instructions

    Make the Frangipane

    • (This stage can be done as much as 3 days ahead of time. Cover the finished frangipane and store it in the fridge. There will be leftovers, but it’s great toasted on bread or mixed into other cookie dough recipes.)
    • Preheat oven at 350-degrees. Line a small rimmed baking sheet with foil. Spread out the pecans on it to mostly be in a single layer. Lightly toast them for a total of 6 to 8 minutes, with a pause in the middle to stir them. Let the pecans cool. Set aside 1 1/4 cups to go into the cookie dough.
    • Pulse the 3/4 cup of pecans and white sugar in a food processor until nuts are very finely ground, which will take less than a minute (don’t let them become paste!). Divide the egg, adding the egg white to the processor; place the yolk in a small bowl, add a sprinkle of sugar to help preserve it, then stash it in the fridge to go into the dough later.
    • Into the food processor, add the butter, espresso powder, salt, and almond extract. Pulse until everything is smooth and combined. Scrape the frangipane into a small bowl and chill for anywhere from 30 minutes (minimum) to 3 days.

    Cookie Dough

    • In the clean food processor, pulse the flour, salt, baking powder, and 1 cup of the reserved pecans until nuts are very finely ground, about 1 minute. (Note that there is still 1/4 cup of pecans reserved for topping the cookies.)
    • In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat the butter, white sugar, and 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar until light and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add in egg yolk and vanilla. Gradually mix in the dry ingredients until just incorporated, about 1 minute.
    • Cover bowl with plastic wrap and chill dough until it is firm enough to be scooped and hold its shape, 30 to 45 minutes.

    Make the Cookies

    • Set oven racks in upper and lower thirds, and preheat at 350-degrees. Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper.
    • Place 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar in a bowl. Scoop out dough by the tablespoon and roll into balls, then roll in confectioners’ sugar, knocking off any excess. Set balls on baking sheets, spaced a few inches apart.
    • Bake cookies for 6 to 8 minutes, until puffed but edges are still soft. Remove sheets from oven. Make an indentation in the center of each cookie with the handle end of a wooden spoon or a similar heatproof object. Spoon a heaping 1/2-teaspoon of frangipane into each well and top with a pecan half from the reserved 1/4 cup.
    • Return cookies to oven and continue to bake until edges are set and very lightly browned, 6 to 8 minutes more. Let cool on baking sheets.
    • If desired, serve with a dusting of extra confectioners’ sugar on top. Cookies keep well in a sealed, room temperature container for up to 5 days.

    OM NOM NOM!

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      Bready or Not: Galette Des Rois

      Posted by on Dec 30, 2020 in Blog, Bready or Not, cake, French | 0 comments

      Eat like royalty without a lot of fuss with this shortcut recipe for Galette Des Rois!

      Bready or Not: Galette Des Rois

      Galette des Rois (King Cake) celebrates Epiphany and is available throughout January in France.

      Bready or Not: Galette Des Rois

      I am so not in France. Nor did I get to go there in June, as planned. Sigh. So, I have to make-do.

      Bready or Not: Galette Des Rois

      However, making-do can still be delicious. Frozen puff pastry is great stuff. You make a frangipane from scratch, but it’s pretty straightforward.

      Bready or Not: Galette Des Rois

      Honestly, the trickiest part for me was figuring out what pattern to etch into the top of the galette–and then hope that I didn’t dig the knife in too deeply.

      Bready or Not: Galette Des Rois

      If you do a Google search for Galette des Rois, you’ll see all sorts of different patterns you can do. I’m happy with my choice. And that I didn’t cut too deeply.

      Bready or Not: Galette Des Rois

      Because I am OCD and can’t bear to waste food, I include a bonus recipe on a great way to bake-up the scraps of puff pastry, too.

      The galette and scraps are tastiest the day they are baked, but they are still good for the next few days, too.

      Adapted from Dorie Greenspan.

      Bready or Not: Galette Des Rois

      Galette des Rois (King Cake) celebrates Epiphany and is available throughout January in France. Make your own using this shortcut take using puff pastry, modified from a Dorie Greenspan recipe. Traditionally, an almond or other small charm is hidden within the cake as an edible surprise (warn the eaters!).
      Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
      Cuisine: French
      Keyword: almond, cake, puff pastry
      Author: Beth Cato

      Equipment

      • baking sheet
      • parchment paper
      • pastry brush

      Ingredients

      Frangipane filling

      • 6 Tablespoons unsalted butter room temperature
      • 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
      • 3/4 cup almond flour sifted
      • 1/4 teaspoon salt
      • 2 large eggs room temperature
      • 1 Tablespoon rum optional but awesome
      • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste

      Cake

      • 1 puff pastry dough box 14-17 ounce package, cold
      • 1 whole almond for the traditional charm

      Instructions

      Prepare the frangipane

      • This can be made up to a day ahead, but needs at least an hour to chill before assembling the galette.
      • Beat together the butter and sugar until they are creamy and light. Add the almond flour and salt. Add one whole egg. Divide the other egg, adding only the white–reserve the yolk for later. Mix in the rum, if using, and the vanilla extract.
      • Transfer to a small bowl. Cover with plastic wrap, pressing it against the top of the mix, then place in fridge to chill.
      • Mix the reserved yolk with 1 teaspoon of cold water, and cover it and set it in the fridge as well.

      Assembling the galette

      • Set out a complete sheet of puff pastry. Cut a 9-1/2 diameter circle out of the middle; if a 9-inch tart pan insert is available, use that as a handy guide. Set aside scraps from edges. Place the cut round on a parchment-lined baking sheet.
      • Repeat the process with the second sheet of puff pastry. Place all of the cut-off bits aside in the fridge for now.
      • Return to the pastry round on the baking sheet. Spread the frangipane evenly over the dough, but leave a 1-inch border bare. Place the almond somewhere on the filling. Moisten the border with some cold water. Set the second round of pastry on top and press it down around the edges to seal them together.
      • Use the back of a butter knife to scallop the edges by creating an indentation about a quarter-inch deep, spaced out about a half-inch apart. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes.
      • Preheat the oven at 425-degrees.
      • Pull out the chilled galette. Brush a thin layer of yolk over the top, but be very careful that it doesn’t drip down over the edge, or the galette won’t rise. Use a paring knife to etch a design on the very top of the galette while taking care not to cut too deeply. Add 6 small slits spaced out to act as steam vents.
      • Drop the oven temperature to 400-degrees. Bake the galette for 30 to 40 minutes, until it is puffed and golden brown. Keep an eye on it. If filling starts to ooze out, scrape it away so that it doesn’t drip off the pan. If the galette is browning too fast, cover it with aluminum foil.
      • Transfer it to a rack to cool for at least 15 minutes. Expect it to deflate some, as that is the way of puff pastry. Best eaten when fresh, served warm or at room temperature, but can be chilled and eaten over the coming days.
      • Bonus: As soon as the galette is out of the oven, put the puff pastry scraps on the parchment. Brush the remaining yolk atop. Then add a topping like pearl sugar, turbinado sugar, or maple sugar. Bake scraps for 15 to 20 minutes, until pieces are puffed and golden. Like the galette, they are best eaten the same day, but are still quite edible after that.

      OM NOM NOM!

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        Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

        Posted by on Dec 23, 2020 in Blog, Bready or Not, british, cheese galore, quick bread, side dish | 0 comments

        Yorkshire puddings are what many Americans also know of as popovers–light, airy, crisp sponges perfect to eat with a roast and gravy!

        Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

        This recipe is for a small batch of puds. Since they are so airy (if they rise right), the six puddings of this recipe are perfect for two or three people.

        Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

        Cheese makes everything better, of course. I used Dubliner Irish Cheddar, as it is available at my nearest Costcos for a good price.

        Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

        Use a good quality cheddar here to really take these puddings to the next level.

        Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

        Modified from Bake from Scratch Magazine.

        Bready or Not: Cheese and Chives Yorkshire Puddings (Small Batch)

        These cheesy Yorkshire puds are perfect to serve with a holiday roast and gravy! Unlike many recipes, this makes a small batch of six puddings, enough for 2 or 3 people. These are light, airy, and oh-so-cheesy. Use the best cheddar you can find–you'll be able to taste the difference.
        Course: Side Dish
        Cuisine: British
        Keyword: cheese, quick bread
        Servings: 2
        Author: Beth Cato

        Equipment

        • metal muffin pan
        • blender

        Ingredients

        • 3/4 cup milk or half & half
        • 2 large eggs room temperature
        • 3 Tablespoons unsalted butter melted, divided
        • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
        • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
        • 1/4 cup quality cheddar cheese (25 grams), freshly grated
        • 1 1/2 Tablespoons fresh chives chopped, plus more for garnish

        Instructions

        • Preheat oven at 425-degrees.
        • In the container of a blender, place milk, eggs, 1 tablespoon melted butter, flour, and salt; process just until smooth. Let rest for 10 minutes.
        • In a small bowl, toss together grated cheese and chives.
        • Place a 12-cup muffin pan in oven for 5 minutes to preheat.
        • Remove muffin pan from oven, and quickly spoon the remaining 2 tablespoons melted butter into the 6 muffin cups that are being used. Return pan to oven for 2 minutes.
        • Remove pan from oven. Working fast, spoon or pour batter into buttered muffin cups, dividing as evenly as possible. Top each with a spoonful of cheese mixture.
        • Bake until puffed and golden brown, 15 to 18 minutes. Garnish with more chives, if desired. Serve immediately. Yorkshires are best fresh as they deflate after baking.

        OM NOM NOM!

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          Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

          Posted by on Dec 16, 2020 in Blog, Bready or Not, cookies | 0 comments

          It’s my understanding that there are likely thousands of Lebkuchen recipes in the world, and here is mine.

          Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

          This traditional German Christmas cookie is like a gingerbread cookie, but is a lot more complex due to the spices used and the citrus mixed in.

          Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

          Even the glaze adds to that wonderfully fresh citrus flavor, as it has a bit of lemon juice mixed in.

          Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

          The only somewhat odd ingredient is chopped-up candied orange. I actually cut up a whole-slice version that Trader Joe’s sells at the holidays, but otherwise candied orange should be found near fruitcake ingredients at many grocery stores.

          Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

          Note that this cookie dough needs to chill for a full day. That gives the flour time to develop and for the spices to really do their thing.

          Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

          And trust me, you want their thing done. These are awesome cookies, sure to delight and surprise anyone who digs in.

          Modified from a recipe printed in Cooking Light Magazine, December 2008.

          Bready or Not: Lebkuchen

          This take on the classic German holiday cookie is packed with complex spices and citrusy notes. Note that the dough needs to chill for a full day prior to baking. The final result is firm and chewy when fresh, and after about two days, they firm up more but remain delicious.
          Course: Dessert, Snack
          Cuisine: German
          Keyword: cookies, gingerbread, holiday, lemon
          Author: Beth Cato

          Ingredients

          Cookies

          • 3/4 cup brown sugar packed
          • 1/2 cup honey
          • 1/4 cup unsalted butter half stick
          • 1/4 cup dark molasses
          • 2 teaspoons espresso powder
          • 1 large egg
          • 3/4 cup ground almonds sifted
          • 1/2 cup candied orange slices chopped, or candied orange peel
          • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 15.75 ounces
          • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
          • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
          • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
          • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
          • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
          • 1/8 teaspoon salt

          Glaze

          • 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
          • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
          • 1 1/2 teaspoons water

          Instructions

          • In a medium saucepan on medium heat, constantly stir together the brown sugar, honey, butter, and molasses until the sugar is dissolved. Make sure it doesn’t come to a boil. Transfer the mixture to large bowl and let it cool to room temperature.
          • Add the espresso powder and egg to the cool sugar mixture. Follow that up with the ground almonds and candied orange bits.
          • In a separate bowl, stir together the rest of the dry ingredients. Gradually combine the two bowls until just mixed. Lift it up and knead it for a minute or so to make sure no flour remains at the bottom.
          • Wrap dough in plastic wrap and stash in the fridge for at least a day.
          • Preheat oven at 325-degrees. Cover two large baking sheets with parchment paper.
          • Divide dough into 4 portions. Keep the other portions chilled while rolling 1 out into a 8×6-inch rectangle. Cut (a pizza slicer or bench knife are great) into 3×1-inch bars. Transfer to baking sheet, setting them an inch apart.
          • Bake for about 20 minutes, or until firm. If cooking both sheets at once, switch their positions about halfway through.
          • As soon as the cookies are out, mix up the glaze. Drizzle glaze back and forth over the warm cookies. Let glaze set for an hour before packing up cookies in sealed containers.

          OM NOM NOM!

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            Giftmas 2020: Help the Edmonton Food Bank!

            Posted by on Dec 15, 2020 in Blog, giftmas | 1 comment

            giftmas 2020

            I’m taking part in Giftmas again this year, an annual effort coordinated by Rhonda Parrish for the benefit of the Edmonton Food Bank. I don’t need to state the reasons why helping food banks is more important this year than ever before. We need to help each other. We can’t connect in person, but we can connect with a few bucks that will help fill bellies and add warmth to the world through kindness. If you’re American like me, your dollars will deliver extra bang with each buck, too. $1 = 3 meals.

            Please help.

            Rhonda asked Giftmas participants to post on the subject of connections. For me, this year has featured an evolving connection with my son.

            He turned fifteen in March. We didn’t get to do his annual birthday trip to IKEA, where he loves following the handout map and the big arrows on the floor, as he has since he was a preschooler. He’s autistic. He loves maps and numbers, and IKEA is all about those things.

            Last year, he started high school. It was not a transition without hiccups. He needs routine and quiet. He struggles to understood the chaos of other people. The lead-in to his birthday was the start of virtual high school. It was… tumultuous, to say the least. The kid who needs routine, losing all semblance of it. Me, I’m diagnosed OCD and not much better at handling this stuff than he is, but I have to be the cool-headed parent because if I crack, he will really crack.

            I’m also the at-home parent as I do this writer thing. I was the one who had to talk him through the fear, the unknowns. I had to talk myself through, too.

            As April chugged along, as masks became the thing, his school days began to find more of a groove. He did, too. He actually found it easier to focus on his work in the online school format. I enjoyed having him around, too, preparing lunch for him and checking in during breaks to see how things were going. It became a situation that bonded us more, as we talked at lunch about the new COVID-19 case numbers for the day and what they meant for our family.

            We’ve continued to work through, day by day, as his sophomore year began in the fall. He started out online, then got to return to school for two days a week for three weeks before an outbreak shut his school down in early November. Soon after that, rising case numbers for Arizona forced his entire district to return to online learning to finish out 2020. He’s handled these transitions oddly well. I’m proud of him. This year has been hard, but he has grown in this time. So have I.

            That said, I selfishly would like fewer growth-through-adversity moments in 2021, for our sakes and for everyone else, too.

            Please help other people end their 2020 and start the new year on a brighter note. Donate to the Edmonton Food Bank today.

            Thank you.

            Follow the entire blog tour through RhondaParrish.com and her social media.

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